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dc.contributor.authorSchwaab, Christopher Joseph
dc.contributor.authorKomendantskaya, Ekaterina
dc.contributor.authorHill, Alisdair
dc.contributor.authorFarka, František
dc.contributor.authorPetrick, Ronald
dc.contributor.authorWells, Joe
dc.contributor.authorHammond, Kevin
dc.contributor.editorAlferes, Jose Julio
dc.contributor.editorJohansson, Moa
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-14T11:30:05Z
dc.date.available2019-01-14T11:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier256607242
dc.identifiercfd98688-3e2a-4da7-b702-984d65624446
dc.identifier85059659950
dc.identifier000704024700013
dc.identifier.citationSchwaab , C J , Komendantskaya , E , Hill , A , Farka , F , Petrick , R , Wells , J & Hammond , K 2019 , Proof-carrying plans . in J J Alferes & M Johansson (eds) , Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages : 21st International Symposium, PADL 2019, Lisbon, Portugal, January 14-15, 2019, Proceedings . Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Programming and Software Engineering) , vol. 11372 , Springer , Cham , pp. 204-220 , 21st International Symposium on Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages (PADL 2019) , Lisbon , Portugal , 14/01/19 . https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-05998-9_13en
dc.identifier.citationconferenceen
dc.identifier.isbn9783030059972
dc.identifier.issn0302-9743
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-4326-4562/work/52572463
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/16855
dc.description.abstractIt is becoming increasingly important to verify safety and security of AI applications. While declarative languages (of the kind found in automated planners and model checkers) are traditionally used for verifying AI systems, a big challenge is to design methods that generate verified executable programs. A good example of such a “verification to implementation” cycle is given by automated planning languages like PDDL, where plans are found via a model search in a declarative language, but then interpreted or compiled into executable code in an imperative language. In this paper, we show that this method can itself be verified. We present a formal framework and a prototype Agda implementation that represent PDDL plans as executable functions that inhabit types that are given by formulae describing planning problems. By exploiting the well-known Curry-Howard correspondence, type-checking then automatically ensures that the generated program corresponds precisely to the specification of the planning problem.
dc.format.extent19
dc.format.extent119228
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofPractical Aspects of Declarative Languagesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLecture Notes in Computer Science (Programming and Software Engineering)en
dc.subjectAPI planningen
dc.subjectCurry-Howard correspondenceen
dc.subjectConstructive logicen
dc.subjectVerificationen
dc.subjectDependent typesen
dc.subjectBC Logicen
dc.subjectQA75 Electronic computers. Computer scienceen
dc.subjectT Technologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccBCen
dc.subject.lccQA75en
dc.subject.lccTen
dc.titleProof-carrying plansen
dc.typeConference itemen
dc.contributor.sponsorEuropean Commissionen
dc.contributor.sponsorEPSRCen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Computer Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Computational Algebraen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-05998-9_13
dc.identifier.grantnumber779882en
dc.identifier.grantnumberEP/P020631/1en


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