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dc.contributor.authorKarg, Katja
dc.contributor.authorSchmelz, Martin
dc.contributor.authorCall, Josep
dc.contributor.authorTomasello, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-25T23:32:46Z
dc.date.available2016-05-25T23:32:46Z
dc.date.issued2015-07
dc.identifier.citationKarg , K , Schmelz , M , Call , J & Tomasello , M 2015 , ' The goggles experiment : can chimpanzees use self-experience to infer what a competitor can see? ' , Animal Behaviour , vol. 105 , pp. 211-221 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.04.028en
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 240324901
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: cc527b19-88b0-4367-828d-65bebec58305
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000356611200023
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84930202278
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8597-8336/work/37477845
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000356611200023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/8875
dc.description.abstractIn two experiments, we investigated whether chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, can use self-experience to infer what another sees. Subjects first gained self-experience with the visual properties of an object (either opaque or see-through). In a subsequent test phase, a human experimenter interacted with the object and we tested whether chimpanzees understood that the experimenter experienced the object as opaque or as see-through. Crucially, in the test phase, the object seemed opaque to the subject in all cases (while the experimenter could see through the one that they had experienced as see-through before), such that she had to use her previous self-experience with the object to correctly infer whether the experimenter could or could not see when looking at the object. Chimpanzees did not attribute their previous self-experience with the object to the experimenter in a gaze-following task (experiment 1); however, they did so successfully in a competitive context (experiment 2). We conclude that chimpanzees successfully used their self-experience to infer what the competitor sees. We discuss our results in relation to the well-known 'goggles experiment' and address alternative explanations.
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Behaviouren
dc.rightsCopyright © 2015 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.04.028en
dc.subjectChimpanzeeen
dc.subjectExperience projectionen
dc.subjectPerspective takingen
dc.subjectSocial cognitionen
dc.subjectTheory of minden
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subjectBF Psychologyen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.subject.lccBFen
dc.titleThe goggles experiment : can chimpanzees use self-experience to infer what a competitor can see?en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.04.028
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2016-05-26


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