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dc.contributor.authorSeydel, Karl B
dc.contributor.authorKampondeni, Samuel D
dc.contributor.authorValim, Clarissa
dc.contributor.authorPotchen, Michael J
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Danny A
dc.contributor.authorMuwalo, Francis W
dc.contributor.authorBirbeck, Gretchen L
dc.contributor.authorBradley, William G
dc.contributor.authorFox, Lindsay L
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Simon J
dc.contributor.authorHammond, Colleen A
dc.contributor.authorHeyderman, Robert S
dc.contributor.authorChilingulo, Cowles A
dc.contributor.authorMolyneux, Malcolm E
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Terrie E
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T15:10:07Z
dc.date.available2016-02-24T15:10:07Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-19
dc.identifier.citationSeydel , K B , Kampondeni , S D , Valim , C , Potchen , M J , Milner , D A , Muwalo , F W , Birbeck , G L , Bradley , W G , Fox , L L , Glover , S J , Hammond , C A , Heyderman , R S , Chilingulo , C A , Molyneux , M E & Taylor , T E 2015 , ' Brain swelling and death in children with cerebral malaria ' , New England Journal of Medicine , vol. 372 , no. 12 , pp. 1126-37 . https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1400116en
dc.identifier.issn0028-4793
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 212895496
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 7302e31e-04f5-44c6-aa42-af6568cf00f8
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 25785970
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84925060831
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/8303
dc.descriptionSupported by a grant (5R01AI034969) from the National Institutes of Health and by a Strategic Award for the Malawi–Liverpool–Wellcome Clinical Research Programme from the Wellcome Trust U.K. General Electric Healthcare donated the Signa 0.35-T magnetic resonance imager (MRI) used in this work, and the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine sponsored the construction of the building that houses the MRI in Malawi.en
dc.description.abstractCase fatality rates among African children with cerebral malaria remain in the range of 15 to 25%. The key pathogenetic processes and causes of death are unknown, but a combination of clinical observations and pathological findings suggests that increased brain volume leading to raised intracranial pressure may play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available in Malawi in 2009, and we used it to investigate the role of brain swelling in the pathogenesis of fatal cerebral malaria in African children.
dc.format.extent12
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofNew England Journal of Medicineen
dc.rights© 2015 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the final published version of the work, which was originally published at https://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1400116en
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectBrain Edemaen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectMalawien
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectOrgan Sizeen
dc.subjectPapilledemaen
dc.subjectCerebralen
dc.subjectR Medicineen
dc.subjectQM Human anatomyen
dc.subjectRA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicineen
dc.subjectRC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatryen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccRen
dc.subject.lccQMen
dc.subject.lccRA0421en
dc.subject.lccRC0321en
dc.titleBrain swelling and death in children with cerebral malariaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Medicineen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1400116
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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