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dc.contributor.authorAnderson, D. R.
dc.contributor.authorTriaud, A. H. M. J.
dc.contributor.authorTurner, O. D.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, D. J. A.
dc.contributor.authorClark, B. J. M.
dc.contributor.authorSmalley, B.
dc.contributor.authorCameron, A. Collier
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, A. P.
dc.contributor.authorGillon, M.
dc.contributor.authorHellier, C.
dc.contributor.authorLovis, C.
dc.contributor.authorMaxted, P. F. L.
dc.contributor.authorPollacco, D.
dc.contributor.authorQueloz, D.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, A. M. S.
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-06T17:01:02Z
dc.date.available2015-03-06T17:01:02Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-10
dc.identifier.citationAnderson , D R , Triaud , A H M J , Turner , O D , Brown , D J A , Clark , B J M , Smalley , B , Cameron , A C , Doyle , A P , Gillon , M , Hellier , C , Lovis , C , Maxted , P F L , Pollacco , D , Queloz , D & Smith , A M S 2015 , ' The well-aligned orbit of Wasp-84b : evidence for disk migration of a hot Jupiter ' , Astrophysical Journal Letters , vol. 800 , no. 1 , L9 . https://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L9en
dc.identifier.issn2041-8205
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 172939086
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c138dd2a-33f9-4add-b256-5cdd6a4272e1
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000349316000009
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8863-7828/work/58531340
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000349316000009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/6191
dc.description.abstractWe report the sky-projected orbital obliquity (spin–orbit angle) of WASP-84 b, a 0.69 planet in an 8.52 day orbit around a G9V/K0V star, to be λ = −0.3 ± 1.7°. We obtain a true obliquity of ψ = 17.3 ± 7.7° from a measurement of the inclination of the stellar spin axis with respect to the sky plane. Due to the young age and the weak tidal forcing of the system, we suggest that the orbit of WASP-84b is unlikely to have both realigned and circularized from the misaligned and/or eccentric orbit likely to have arisen from high-eccentricity migration. Therefore we conclude that the planet probably migrated via interaction with the protoplanetary disk. This would make it the first "hot Jupiter" () to have been shown to have migrated via this pathway. Further, we argue that the distribution of obliquities for planets orbiting cool stars (Teff < 6250 K) suggests that high-eccentricity migration is an important pathway for the formation of short-orbit, giant planets.
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAstrophysical Journal Lettersen
dc.rights© 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Reproduced in accordance with the AAS copyright policy. The final version can be found at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L9en
dc.subjectPlanets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stabilityen
dc.subjectPlanet-disk interactionsen
dc.subjectPlanets and satellites: individual (WASP-84b)en
dc.subjectPlanet-star interactionsen
dc.subjectStars: individual (WASP-84)en
dc.subjectExoplanet HD 80606Ben
dc.subjectTidal dissipationen
dc.subjectStellar obliquityen
dc.subjectGiant planeten
dc.subjectLong-perioden
dc.subjectTransiten
dc.subjectSpinen
dc.subjectSystemen
dc.subjectMisalignmenten
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.subjectQB Astronomyen
dc.subjectQC Physicsen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subject.lccQBen
dc.subject.lccQCen
dc.titleThe well-aligned orbit of Wasp-84b : evidence for disk migration of a hot Jupiteren
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.contributor.sponsorPPARC - Now STFCen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Physics and Astronomyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L9
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.grantnumberST/J001651/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberST/I000666/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberPP/D000890/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberST/K001515/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberST/M001296/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberST/G001006/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberPP/F000065/1en


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