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dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Victoria Sophie
dc.contributor.authorRann, James
dc.contributor.authorTsymbalyuk, Darya
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-26T14:30:02Z
dc.date.available2021-07-26T14:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-14
dc.identifier.citationDonovan , V S , Rann , J & Tsymbalyuk , D 2021 , ' Slavic studies goes public : who? what? why? where? when?” ' , Modern Languages Open , vol. 1 , 4 . https://doi.org/10.3828/mlo.v0i0.349en
dc.identifier.issn2052-5397
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 272921719
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 3a17efc7-12e7-4699-8ad5-ebdeae03476d
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-5987-0965/work/97885217
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8293-5541/work/97885631
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/23633
dc.description.abstractPublic engagement, impact, and knowledge exchange are concepts that today rank highly on research agendas across the UK. Yet the discussion of what constitutes engagement, on the politics and practicalities of building collaborations with non-academic partners, and on the ethics of conducting such work are still at their very earliest stages. Emerging from a British Academy-funded workshop, “Slavic Studies Goes Public: Creating an ECR Network in the Public Humanities,” this series of essays and critical-creative works — collaborations at the boundary of academic writing and artistic practice — explores what we see as some of the most important questions relating to public engagement in our field. What institutional factors and politics inform and determine the “who” of our public engagement work? How can the us/them dichotomy be rethought and with it the idea of “giving voice” to “voiceless” communities? How can those leading projects be sure that the legacy or change is desired by or necessary for the communities engaged? When does engagement end? When should it never have begun? Participants at the workshop responded to these questions in six reflective essays and three critical-creative collaborations. Rather than offering definitive answers, we hope that the workshop and this series will form a point of departure, engendering further conversations, collaborations, and creativity around Modern Languages and engagement.
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofModern Languages Openen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.subjectPG Slavic, Baltic, Albanian languages and literatureen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccPGen
dc.titleSlavic studies goes public : who? what? why? where? when?”en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Russianen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of International Relationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3828/mlo.v0i0.349
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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