Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorMolina-Moya, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorCiobanu, Nelly
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Marta
dc.contributor.authorPrat-Aymerich, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorCrudu, Valeriu
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Emily R.
dc.contributor.authorCodreanu, Alexandru
dc.contributor.authorSloan, Derek J.
dc.contributor.authorCuevas, Luis E.
dc.contributor.authorDominguez, Jose
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T17:30:01Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T17:30:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-21
dc.identifier.citationMolina-Moya , B , Ciobanu , N , Hernandez , M , Prat-Aymerich , C , Crudu , V , Adams , E R , Codreanu , A , Sloan , D J , Cuevas , L E & Dominguez , J 2020 , ' Molecular detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis in oral mucosa from patients with presumptive tuberculosis ' , Journal of Clinical Medicine , vol. 9 , no. 12 , 4124 . https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9124124en
dc.identifier.issn2077-0383
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 271777593
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 76fd5dd4-651a-4812-b043-881cdb0bad3a
dc.identifier.otherBibtex: jcm9124124
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000601933600001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/21183
dc.descriptionFunding: This research was funded by a Strategic Award grant from the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (grant DRIA2014-309) and its cofounders, the Medical Research Council UK, and Institutode Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Spain (PI116/01912); and from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 823854 (INNOVA4TB).en
dc.description.abstractTuberculosis (TB) diagnosis is increasingly based on the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) DNA in sputum using molecular diagnostic tests as the first test for diagnosis. However, sputum can be difficult to obtain in children, patients without productive cough, and the elderly and approaches testing non-sputum samples are needed. We evaluated whether TB can be detected from the oral mucosa of patients with TB. Adults with presumptive TB were examined using culture, Xpert MTB/RIF, smear microscopy and X-Rays. Oral mucosa swabs collected on PrimeStore-MTM, stored at room temperature if tested within 30 days or at −20 °C if examined at a later time. RT-PCR was performed to detect M. tuberculosis DNA. Eighty patients had bacteriologically-confirmed TB, 34 had bacteriologically-negative TB (negative tests but abnormal X-rays) and 152 were considered not to have TB (not TB). Oral swabs RT-PCR were positive in 29/80 (36.3%) bacteriologically-confirmed, 9/34 (26.5%) bacteriologically-negative and 29/152 (19.1%) not TB. The yield varied among samples stored for less and more than 30 days (p = 0.013) from 61% (11/18) and 29% (18/62) among bacteriologically confirmed, and 30.8% (4/13) and 23.8% (5/21) among bacteriologically-negative participants. Among not TB patients, the specificity was 80.9% (123/152), being 78.3% (18/23) among samples stored less than 30 days and 81.4% (105/129) among samples stored for more than 30 days (p = 0.46). The detection of M. tuberculosis in oral mucosa samples is feasible, but storage conditions may affect the yield.
dc.format.extent7
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Medicineen
dc.rightsCopyright ©2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution(CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.subjectOral swaben
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectReal-time PCRen
dc.subjectQR Microbiologyen
dc.subjectRC Internal medicineen
dc.subjectE-NDASen
dc.subject.lccQRen
dc.subject.lccRCen
dc.titleMolecular detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis in oral mucosa from patients with presumptive tuberculosisen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Medicineen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Infection and Global Health Divisionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Infection Groupen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9124124
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record