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dc.contributor.authorHedley, Gordon James
dc.contributor.authorRuseckas, Arvydas
dc.contributor.authorSamuel, Ifor David William
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-14T12:30:29Z
dc.date.available2016-12-14T12:30:29Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-25
dc.identifier247959408
dc.identifier4a7851e3-bb8d-45a7-9643-72c8db35696d
dc.identifier85010818141
dc.identifier000392910400008
dc.identifier.citationHedley , G J , Ruseckas , A & Samuel , I D W 2017 , ' Light harvesting for organic photovoltaics ' , Chemical Reviews , vol. 117 , no. 2 , pp. 796-837 . https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00215en
dc.identifier.issn0009-2665
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/9971
dc.descriptionThe authors are grateful to the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council of the UK (grants EP/J009016/1 and EP/L017008/1) and the European Research Council (grant number 321305) for financial support. IDWS also acknowledges a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award.en
dc.description.abstractThe field of organic photovoltaics has developed rapidly over the last 2 decades, and small solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 13% have been demonstrated. Light absorbed in the organic layers forms tightly bound excitons that are split into free electrons and holes using heterojunctions of electron donor and acceptor materials, which are then extracted at electrodes to give useful electrical power. This review gives a concise description of the fundamental processes in photovoltaic devices, with the main emphasis on the characterization of energy transfer and its role in dictating device architecture, including multilayer planar heterojunctions, and on the factors that impact free carrier generation from dissociated excitons. We briefly discuss harvesting of triplet excitons, which now attracts substantial interest when used in conjunction with singlet fission. Finally, we introduce the techniques used by researchers for characterization and engineering of bulk heterojunctions to realize large photocurrents, and examine the formed morphology in three prototypical blends.
dc.format.extent42
dc.format.extent43841733
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofChemical Reviewsen
dc.subjectQC Physicsen
dc.subjectTP Chemical technologyen
dc.subjectSDG 7 - Affordable and Clean Energyen
dc.subject.lccQCen
dc.subject.lccTPen
dc.titleLight harvesting for organic photovoltaicsen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.contributor.sponsorEPSRCen
dc.contributor.sponsorEPSRCen
dc.contributor.sponsorEPSRCen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Physics and Astronomyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Condensed Matter Physicsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00215
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.grantnumberN/Aen
dc.identifier.grantnumberep/l017008/1en
dc.identifier.grantnumberEP/K031252/1en


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