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dc.contributor.authorRice, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-04T00:32:51Z
dc.date.available2016-12-04T00:32:51Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationRice , T 2016 , ' "Are you proud to be British?" : Mobile film shows, local voices and the demise of the British Empire in Africa ' , Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television , vol. 36 , no. 3 , pp. 331-351 . https://doi.org/10.1080/01439685.2015.1049863en
dc.identifier.issn0143-9685
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 195584096
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: de8d866f-22cd-45e9-a717-8877ecb5426c
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84930336896
dc.identifier.otherBibCode: NIS195584096
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000382335900003
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-4333-7493/work/77524756
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/9927
dc.description.abstractThe Colonial Film Unit (CFU) (1939–1955) produced over 200 films, which were exhibited non-theatrically to African audiences through its fleet of mobile cinema vans. While the CFU closely monitored, and theorised on, its film texts, the particular ways in which these films were exhibited and received was afforded far less attention and remains critically overlooked by scholars. In this article, I examine the development of the mobile film show across a range of colonial territories. The London-based CFU sought to standardise film exhibition across the empire, imagining these film shows as political events, as a means of monitoring, addressing and homogenising disparate groups of colonial subjects. The regulation of film space can be understood within this context as part of the broader effort to regulate colonial space. Integral to this process was the local commentator, an often-overlooked figure within African cinema. The local commentator would organise the film show, provide additional talks, answer questions, counter unrest and recontextualise the films for local audiences, often without any direct European supervision. In examining government reports, personal interviews and, in particular, a series of audience surveys, the article repositions the commentator as a pivotal presence in the latter years of empire; a rising voice within African cultural and political life.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofHistorical Journal of Film, Radio and Televisionen
dc.rightsCopyright 2015 IAMHIST & Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television on 03/06/2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01439685.2015.1049863en
dc.subjectBritish Empireen
dc.subjectSub-Saharan African cinemaen
dc.subjectColonial cinemaen
dc.subjectMobile film showsen
dc.subjectAudiencesen
dc.subjectExhibitionen
dc.subjectFilm commentatoren
dc.subjectColonial film uniten
dc.subjectPN1993 Motion Picturesen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subject.lccPN1993en
dc.title"Are you proud to be British?" : Mobile film shows, local voices and the demise of the British Empire in Africaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Film Studiesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studiesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/01439685.2015.1049863
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2016-12-03


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