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dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, Emma
dc.contributor.authorCresswell, Will
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T23:31:11Z
dc.date.available2016-06-29T23:31:11Z
dc.date.issued2015-11
dc.identifier.citationBlackburn , E & Cresswell , W 2015 , ' Fine-scale habitat use during the non-breeding season suggests that winter habitat does not limit breeding populations of a declining long-distance Palearctic migrant ' Journal of Avian Biology , vol. 46 , no. 6 , pp. 622-633 . https://doi.org/10.1111/jav.00738en
dc.identifier.issn0908-8857
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 192076246
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: a1712560-43f5-4fe3-9101-1e8a98daa800
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84955183217
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-4684-7624/work/60426945
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000367687400009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/9062
dc.descriptionDate of Acceptance: 23/05/2015en
dc.description.abstractFor migrant birds, what habitats are suitable during the non-breeding season influences habitat availability, population resilience to habitat loss, and ultimately survival. Consequently, habitat preferences during winter and whether habitat segregation according to age and sex occurs directly influences migration ecology, survival and breeding success. We tested the fine-scale habitat preferences of a declining Palearctic migrant, the Whinchat Saxicola rubetra, on its wintering grounds in West Africa. We explored the influence of habitat at the territory-scale and whether dominance-based habitat occupancy occurs by describing the variation in habitat characteristics across wintering territories, the degree of habitat change within territories held throughout winter, and whether habitat characteristics influenced territory size and space-use within territories or differed with age and sex. Habitat characteristics varied substantially across territories and birds maintained the same territories even though habitat changed significantly throughout winter. We found no evidence of dominance-based habitat occupancy; instead, territories were smaller if they contained more perching shrubs or maize crops, and areas with more perching shrubs were used more often within territories, likely because perches are important for foraging and territory defence. Our findings suggest that Whinchats have non-specialised habitat requirements within their wintering habitat of open savannah and farmland, and respond to habitat variation by adjusting territory size and space-use within territories instead of competing with conspecifics. Whinchats show a tolerance for human-modified habitats and results support previous findings that some crop types may provide high-quality wintering habitat by increasing perch density and foraging opportunities. By having non-specialised requirements within broad winter habitat types, migrants are likely to be flexible to changing wintering conditions in Africa, both within and across winters, so possibly engendering some resilience to the rapid anthropogenic habitat degradation occurring throughout their wintering range.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Avian Biologyen
dc.rightsCopyright 2015 The Authors. Journal of Avian Biology Copyright 2015 Nordic Society Oikos. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Fine-scale habitat use during the non-breeding season suggests that winter habitat does not limit breeding populations of a declining long-distance Palearctic migrant Blackburn, E. & Cresswell, W. 2015 In : Journal of Avian Biology. Early View, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jav.00738. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.en
dc.subjectPalearctic migranten
dc.subjectWinter ecologyen
dc.subjectSaxicola rubetraen
dc.subjectWinter habitaten
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleFine-scale habitat use during the non-breeding season suggests that winter habitat does not limit breeding populations of a declining long-distance Palearctic migranten
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Scottish Oceans Instituteen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.St Andrews Sustainability Instituteen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/jav.00738
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2016-06-30


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