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dc.contributor.authorAmici, Federica
dc.contributor.authorVisalberghi, Elisabetta
dc.contributor.authorCall, Josep
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T10:30:11Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T10:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-22
dc.identifier.citationAmici , F , Visalberghi , E & Call , J 2014 , ' Lack of prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys : convergent evidence from two different food distribution tasks ' , Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , vol. 281 , no. 1793 , 20141699 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1699en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 240324997
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: cfb82175-49a4-4ac2-93c8-e44b5b0d7ed9
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000341560300022
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84939963149
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8597-8336/work/37477842
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000341560300022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/8637
dc.descriptionThis work was conducted while the first author held a Humboldt Research Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers (Humboldt ID no. 1138999).en
dc.description.abstractProsociality can be defined as any behaviour performed to alleviate the needs of others or to improve their welfare. Prosociality has probably played an essential role in the evolution of cooperative behaviour and several studies have already investigated it in primates to understand the evolutionary origins of human prosociality. Two main tasks have been used to test prosociality in a food context. In the Platforms task, subjects can prosocially provide food to a partner by selecting a prosocial platform over a selfish one. In the Tokens task, subjects can prosocially provide food to a partner by selecting a prosocial token over a selfish one. As these tasks have provided mixed results, we used both tasks to test prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys. Our results provided no compelling evidence of prosociality in a food context in any of the species tested. Additionally, our study revealed serious limitations of the Tokens task as it has been previously used. These results highlight the importance of controlling for confounding variables and of using multiple tasks to address inconsistencies present in the literature.
dc.format.extent9
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1699en
dc.subjectProsocial behaviouren
dc.subjectPrimatesen
dc.subjectOther-regarding preferencesen
dc.subjectApesen
dc.subjectMonkeysen
dc.subjectTamarins saguinus-oedipusen
dc.subjectUnrelated group membersen
dc.subjectCebus-Apellaen
dc.subjectHuman cooperationen
dc.subjectToken transfersen
dc.subjectChimpanzeesen
dc.subjectReciprocityen
dc.subjectRECIPROCITYen
dc.subjectToleranceen
dc.subjectMotivationsen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subjectBF Psychologyen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.subject.lccBFen
dc.titleLack of prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys : convergent evidence from two different food distribution tasksen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1699
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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