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dc.contributor.authorOto-Peralías, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorRomero-Ávila, Diego
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-07T08:40:03Z
dc.date.available2015-09-07T08:40:03Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.citationOto-Peralías , D & Romero-Ávila , D 2014 , ' The distribution of legal traditions around the world : A contribution to the legal-origins theory ' , Journal of Law and Economics , vol. 57 , no. 3 , pp. 561-628 . https://doi.org/10.1086/676556en
dc.identifier.issn0022-2186
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 211244806
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 9f044162-a1dd-4676-a1bf-d5c01453c72e
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84922469000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/7408
dc.description.abstractThe distribution of the common law was conditioned by a colonial strategy sensitive to the colonies’ level of endowments, exhibiting a more effective implantation of the legal system in initially sparsely populated territories with a temperate climate. This translates into a negative relationship of precolonial population density and settler mortality with legal outcomes for common-law countries. By contrast, the implantation of the French civil law was not systematically influenced by initial conditions, which is reflected in the lack of such a relationship for this legal family. The common law does not generally lead to legal outcomes superior to those provided by the French civil law when precolonial population density and/or settler mortality are high. The form of colonial rule in British colonies is found to mediate between precolonial endowments and postcolonial legal outcomes.
dc.format.extent67
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Law and Economicsen
dc.rights© 2014, The University of Chicago. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/676556en
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLegal originsen
dc.subjectLegal outcomesen
dc.subjectDoing businessen
dc.subjectColonialismen
dc.subjectEndowmentsen
dc.subjectIndirect ruleen
dc.subjectK Law (General)en
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subject.lccK1en
dc.titleThe distribution of legal traditions around the world : A contribution to the legal-origins theoryen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Managementen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Responsible Banking and Financeen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1086/676556
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/676556en


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