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dc.contributor.authorBird, David McK.
dc.contributor.authorJones, John T.
dc.contributor.authorOpperman, Charles H.
dc.contributor.authorKikuchi, Taisei
dc.contributor.authorDanchin, Etienne G. J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-24T15:10:03Z
dc.date.available2015-08-24T15:10:03Z
dc.date.issued2015-02
dc.identifier.citationBird , D M , Jones , J T , Opperman , C H , Kikuchi , T & Danchin , E G J 2015 , ' Signatures of adaptation to plant parasitism in nematode genomes ' , Parasitology , vol. 142 , no. S1 , pp. S71-S84 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182013002163en
dc.identifier.issn0031-1820
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 208027014
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 78a212fb-e330-45c2-899f-7838e2da66d5
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000349552500007
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84894249416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/7319
dc.descriptionEach author is, or was, at the time of the work, a paid employee of their affiliated organization. The James Hutton Institute receives funding from the Scottish Government. TK is funded by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 20353659 and 23248024 Date of Acceptance: 27/11/2013en
dc.description.abstractPlant-parasitic nematodes cause considerable damage to global agriculture. The ability to parasitize plants is a derived character that appears to have independently emerged several times in the phylum Nematoda. Morphological convergence to feeding style has been observed, but whether this is emergent from molecular convergence is less obvious. To address this, we assess whether genomic signatures can be associated with plant parasitism by nematodes. In this review, we report genomic features and characteristics that appear to be common in plant-parasitic nematodes while absent or rare in animal parasites, predators or free-living species. Candidate horizontal acquisitions of parasitism genes have systematically been found in all plant-parasitic species investigated at the sequence level. Presence of peptides that mimic plant hormones also appears to be a trait of plant-parasitic species. Annotations of the few genomes of plant-parasitic nematodes available to date have revealed a set of apparently species-specific genes on every occasion. Effector genes, important for parasitism are frequently found among those species-specific genes, indicating poor overlap. Overall, nematodes appear to have developed convergent genomic solutions to adapt to plant parasitism.
dc.format.extent14
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofParasitologyen
dc.rights© Cambridge University Press 2014. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectNematodesen
dc.subjectGenomesen
dc.subjectPlant parasitismen
dc.subjectAdaptationen
dc.subjectConvergenceen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleSignatures of adaptation to plant parasitism in nematode genomesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Biomedical Sciences Research Complexen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182013002163
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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