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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorCox Singh, Janet
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-11T15:01:01Z
dc.date.available2015-05-11T15:01:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifier.citationAhmed , M A & Cox Singh , J 2015 , ' Plasmodium knowlesi – an emerging pathogen ' , ISBT Science Series , vol. 10 , no. S1 , pp. 134-140 . https://doi.org/10.1111/voxs.12115en
dc.identifier.issn1751-2816
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 186725484
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 92940389-66e3-4a36-8fdc-9a428ab76b8d
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000455604900021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/6630
dc.description.abstractTen years have passed since the publication of a large focus of Plasmodium knowlesi infections in the human population. The discovery was made during molecular investigation of atypical P. malariae cases in the Kapit Health Division, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Patients were more symptomatic with higher parasite counts than expected in P. malariae infections. The investigation found only P. knowlesi DNA present in patient blood samples. Morphological similarity had allowed P. knowlesi to masquerade as P. malariae during routine diagnostic microscopy for malaria. P. knowlesi, a malaria parasite of macaque monkeys, had entered the human population. The subsequent development of P. knowlesi species-specific PCR assays soon demonstrated that the entry was not confined the Kapit Division but extended across island and mainland Southeast Asia. Relevant clinical descriptions and guidelines for the treatment and management of patents with P. knowlesi malaria were not available. Nor was it clear whether P. knowlesi had undergone a host switch event into the human population or infections were zoonotic. The outputs of studies on P. knowlesi malaria during the past 10 years will be summarized, highlighting major findings within the context of pathophysiology, virulence, host switch events, treatment, control and importantly malaria elimination.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofISBT Science Seriesen
dc.rights© 2015 The Authors ISBT Science Series published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Blood Transfusion. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectPlasmodiumen
dc.subjectKnowlesien
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectPathophysiologyen
dc.subjectVirulenceen
dc.subjectZoonosisen
dc.subjectR Medicineen
dc.subjectQR Microbiologyen
dc.subject.lccRen
dc.subject.lccQRen
dc.titlePlasmodium knowlesi – an emerging pathogenen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Medicineen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Infection Groupen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Biomedical Sciences Research Complexen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/voxs.12115
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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