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dc.contributor.authorSamuni, Liran
dc.contributor.authorMundry, Roger
dc.contributor.authorTerkel, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorZuberbuehler, Klaus
dc.contributor.authorHobaiter, Cat
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-07T00:01:44Z
dc.date.available2015-02-07T00:01:44Z
dc.date.issued2014-02
dc.identifier.citationSamuni , L , Mundry , R , Terkel , J , Zuberbuehler , K & Hobaiter , C 2014 , ' Socially learned habituation to human observers in wild chimpanzees ' , Animal Cognition , vol. Early online . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-014-0731-6en
dc.identifier.issn1435-9448
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 97078064
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 2184f4e8-2de3-4778-ab9f-cb3f959960a0
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84903121131
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-3893-0524/work/46125064
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000338235200015
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8378-088X/work/64360775
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/6076
dc.descriptionFieldwork of CH and LS was funded by grants from the British Academy and a Leverhulme Trust’s Research Leadership Award.en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Habituation to human observers is an essential tool in animal behaviour research. Habituation occurs when repeated and inconsequential exposure to a human observer gradually reduces an animal’s natural aversive response. Despite the importance of habituation, little is known about the psychological mechanisms facilitating it in wild ani- mals. Although animal learning theory offers some account, the patterns are more complex in natural than in laboratory settings, especially in large social groups in which individual experiences vary and individuals influ- ence each other. Here, we investigate the role of social learning during the habituation process of a wild chim- panzee group, the Waibira community of Budongo Forest, Uganda. Through post hoc hypothesis testing, we found that the immigration of two well-habituated, young females from the neighbouring Sonso community had a significant effect on the behaviour of non-habituated Waibira indi- viduals towards human observers, suggesting that habitu- ation is partially acquired via social learning.
dc.format.extent9
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Cognitionen
dc.rightsCopyright 2014, Springer-Verlag. This is the accepted proofs of the article. The final publication is avialable from Springer-Verlag via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-014-0731-6en
dc.subjectFemale transferen
dc.subjectObservational conditioningen
dc.subjectDispersalen
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectSocial referencingen
dc.subjectSocial learningen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titleSocially learned habituation to human observers in wild chimpanzeesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-014-0731-6
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2015-02-07


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