Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorZuberbuehler, Klaus
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-01T16:01:09Z
dc.date.available2014-12-01T16:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2014-10
dc.identifier.citationZuberbuehler , K 2014 , ' Experimental field studies with non-human primates ' , Current Opinion in Neurobiology , vol. 28 , pp. 150-156 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2014.07.012en
dc.identifier.issn0959-4388
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 157937823
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 41142c11-7734-4b94-b628-4b351e6eba65
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000343363000025
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84904873708
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000343363000025
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8378-088X/work/64360777
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5849
dc.descriptionThis project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283871.en
dc.description.abstractOne way to study language evolution is to compare human communication with closely related non-human primate species. This comparative approach has turned to be especially productive if subjects are studied under natural field conditions in which they have evolved. Various observation techniques have been developed, but field experiments are often needed to clarify underlying cause-effect relations. Here, I review the main experimental designs that are suitable for primate fieldwork and discuss some scientific advancements that they have generated. Field experiments are notoriously difficult to carry out for a range of reasons that are discussed. Nonetheless, considerable progress has been made in recent years, including with great apes, which have traditionally been neglected in experimental research in the wild.
dc.format.extent7
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Neurobiologyen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2014.04.004en
dc.subjectGibbons hylobates-muellerien
dc.subjectAlarm callsen
dc.subjectVervet monkeysen
dc.subjectWild chimpanzeesen
dc.subjectPlayback experimentsen
dc.subjectDiana monkeysen
dc.subjectSemantic communicationen
dc.subjectVocal recognitiionen
dc.subjectJapanese monkeysen
dc.subjectMacaca-sylvanusen
dc.subjectBF Psychologyen
dc.subjectRC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatryen
dc.subject.lccBFen
dc.subject.lccRC0321en
dc.titleExperimental field studies with non-human primatesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2014.07.012
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record