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dc.contributor.authorBurns, Lorna Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-03T00:01:25Z
dc.date.available2014-11-03T00:01:25Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-03
dc.identifier.citationBurns , L M 2013 , ' Philosophy of the imagination : time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown ' , Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 49 , no. 2 , pp. 174–186 . https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2013.776378en
dc.identifier.issn1744-9855
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 42538076
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 0bb92723-68ec-495d-b2e3-60091b033886
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84877675784
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-2142-8853/work/60631212
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5661
dc.descriptionThis is a special issue of the Journal of Postcolonial Writing edited by Lorna Burns and Wendy Knepperen
dc.description.abstractIn his fictional recreation of the People’s Temple massacre, Jonestown, Harris presents us with a protagonist who counter-actualizes the trauma that wounds him, living creatively out of the event and constructing an alternative present-future. Drawing on Deleuzian philosophy, this essay argues for a re-conceptualization of Jonestown in terms that evoke not only Deleuze’s philosophy of time and immanence but also his distinction, via Nietzsche, between active and reactive forces. By means of a character (Francisco Bone) who embraces the power of transformation, creation and difference-in-itself, Harris demonstrates the value of active forces that do not depend on external recognition or dialectical negation in order to be for a postcolonial philosophy of the imagination.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Postcolonial Writingen
dc.rightsThis is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in the Journal of Postcolonial Writing, Vol. 49, No. 2 (2013) pp. 174–186 [copyright Taylor & Francis], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17449855.2013.776378#.UahtGpUTHHgen
dc.subjectJonestownen
dc.subjectWilson Harrisen
dc.subjectGilles Deleuzeen
dc.subjectthe eventen
dc.subjecttimeen
dc.subjectimmanenceen
dc.subjectPR English literatureen
dc.subject.lccPRen
dc.titlePhilosophy of the imagination : time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestownen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Englishen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2013.776378
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2014-11-03


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