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dc.contributor.authorLong, Jed
dc.contributor.authorNelson, T.A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-16T16:01:01Z
dc.date.available2014-09-16T16:01:01Z
dc.date.issued2013-02-01
dc.identifier.citationLong , J & Nelson , T A 2013 , ' A review of quantitative methods for movement data ' , International Journal of Geographical Information Science , vol. 27 , no. 2 , pp. 292-318 . https://doi.org/10.1080/13658816.2012.682578en
dc.identifier.issn1365-8816
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 69223256
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 6f481aed-c269-41b1-8c21-4bcb5db7b444
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84874416145
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000315190800006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5417
dc.descriptionSupport for this work was obtained from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and GEOIDE through the Government of Canada’s Networks for Centres of Excellence program.en
dc.description.abstractThe collection, visualization, and analysis of movement data is at the forefront of geographic information science research. Movement data are generally collected by recording an object's spatial location (e.g., XY coordinates) at discrete time intervals. Methods for extracting useful information, for example space-time patterns, from these increasingly large and detailed datasets have lagged behind the technology for generating them. In this article we review existing quantitative methods for analyzing movement data. The objective of this article is to provide a synthesis of the existing literature on quantitative analysis of movement data while identifying those techniques that have merit with novel datasets. Seven classes of methods are identified: (1) time geography, (2) path descriptors, (3) similarity indices, (4) pattern and cluster methods, (5) individual-group dynamics, (6) spatial field methods, and (7) spatial range methods. Challenges routinely faced in quantitative analysis of movement data include difficulties with handling space and time attributes together, representing time in GIS, and using classical statistical testing procedures with space-time movement data. Areas for future research include investigating equivalent distance comparisons in space and time, measuring interactions between moving objects, developing predictive frameworks for movement data, integrating movement data with existing geographic layers, and incorporating theory from time geography into movement models. In conclusion, quantitative analysis of movement data is an active research area with tremendous opportunity for new developments and methods.
dc.format.extent27
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geographical Information Scienceen
dc.rights© 2012. Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published in the International Journal of Geographical Information Science on 11 July 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13658816.2012.682578en
dc.subjectG Geography (General)en
dc.subject.lccG1en
dc.titleA review of quantitative methods for movement dataen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Geoinformaticsen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Bell-Edwards Geographic Data Instituteen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/13658816.2012.682578
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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