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dc.contributor.authorCoetzee, V.
dc.contributor.authorPerrett, D.I.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-04T16:01:02Z
dc.date.available2014-09-04T16:01:02Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-13
dc.identifier.citationCoetzee , V & Perrett , D I 2014 , ' Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on African skin ' , Journal of Biomedical Optics , vol. 19 , no. 2 . https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.2.025004en
dc.identifier.issn1083-3668
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 145750859
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 42e88edc-b076-482f-83e3-7252ac1e50df
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84897811346
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000332830900017
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-6025-0939/work/64360945
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5348
dc.descriptionThe authors were funded by the South African National Research Foundation (V.C.), the British Academy, and Wolfson Foundation (D.P.).en
dc.description.abstractThe quantification of skin carotenoid levels has a range of applications in Caucasian populations, from serving as a versatile and noninvasive biomarker (e.g., of systemic carotenoid levels, carotenoid consumption, the antioxidative capacity of skin, and oxidative stress) to being used in appearance-based interventions. Yet, no study has investigated the quantitative effect of carotenoid supplementation on African skin. The aim of this study was to determine if beta-carotene supplementation produces a significant color change in three different regions of African skin. To do so we supplemented the diet of African participants with beta-carotene over an eight-week period. Reflectance spectrophotometry measurements were taken on a weekly basis for the duration of the supplementation study. Results show a significant increase in the carotenoid coloration of lightly pigmented skin (palm of the hand) and highly pigmented skin with low sun exposure (inner arm) after supplementation. The latter was no longer significant after Bonferroni correction. The carotenoid coloration of highly pigmented skin areas with high sun exposure did not increase significantly. Skin carotenoid measurements of the palm of the hand might, therefore, serve as a potential biomarker for systemic carotenoid concentrations in people of African descent.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomedical Opticsen
dc.rightsCopyright 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.en
dc.subjectQ Science (General)en
dc.subject.lccQ1en
dc.titleEffect of beta-carotene supplementation on African skinen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.2.025004
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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