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dc.contributor.authorCunningham, L.
dc.contributor.authorVogel, H.
dc.contributor.authorWennrich, V.
dc.contributor.authorJuschus, O.
dc.contributor.authorNowaczyk, N.
dc.contributor.authorRosen, P.
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T09:31:07Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T09:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-14
dc.identifier.citationCunningham , L , Vogel , H , Wennrich , V , Juschus , O , Nowaczyk , N & Rosen , P 2013 , ' Amplified bioproductivity during Transition IV (332 000-342 000 yr ago) : evidence from the geochemical record of Lake El'gygytgyn ' , Climate of the Past , vol. 9 , no. 2 , pp. 679-686 . https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-9-679-2013en
dc.identifier.issn1814-9324
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 134406215
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e9b037b1-6d21-4da5-bcdc-93993dbbaaf7
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000317009700011
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84881130929
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5058
dc.descriptionFunding was provided by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF; grant no. 03G0586A, B), the German Research Foundation (DFG, JU 465/2-1), FORMAS and Vetenskapsradet. This research was also supported by the Climate Impacts Research Centre (Umea University) who provided salary to Laura Cunningham and Peter Rosen.en
dc.description.abstractTo date, terrestrial archives of long-term climatic change within the Arctic have widely been restricted to ice cores from Greenland and, more recently, sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn in northeast Arctic Russia. Sediments from this lake contain a paleoclimate record of glacial-interglacial cycles during the last three million years. Low-resolution studies at this lake have suggested that changes observed during Transition IV (the transition from marine isotope stage (MIS) 10 to MIS 9) are of greater amplitude than any observed since. In this study, geochemical parameters are used to infer past climatic conditions thus providing the first high-resolution analyses of Transition IV from a terrestrial Arctic setting. These results demonstrate that a significant shift in climate was subsequently followed by a rapid increase in biogenic silica (BSi) production. Following this sharp increase, bioproductivity remained high, but variable, for over a thousand years. This study reveals differences in the timing and magnitude of change within the ratio of silica to titanium (Si/Ti) and BSi records that would not be apparent in lower resolution studies. This has significant implications for the increasingly common use of Si/Ti data as an alternative to traditional BSi measurements.
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofClimate of the Pasten
dc.rights© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)en
dc.subjectTransform infrared-spectroscopyen
dc.subjectClimate variabilityen
dc.subjectCrater lakeen
dc.subjectOrganic-matteren
dc.subjectNorth-Atlanticen
dc.subjectCore PG1351en
dc.subjectNE Russiaen
dc.subjectIce-coreen
dc.subjectSiberiaen
dc.subjectSedimentsen
dc.subjectG Geography (General)en
dc.subject.lccG1en
dc.titleAmplified bioproductivity during Transition IV (332 000-342 000 yr ago) : evidence from the geochemical record of Lake El'gygytgynen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Geography and Geosciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Earth & Environmental Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.5194/cp-9-679-2013
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.clim-past.net/9/679/2013/en


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