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dc.contributor.authorVigoder, Felipe de Mello
dc.contributor.authorRitchie, Michael Gordon
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Gabriella
dc.contributor.authorPeixoto, Alexandre Afranio
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-16T15:01:00Z
dc.date.available2014-07-16T15:01:00Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier97910039
dc.identifier4c70eb51-4f0a-444a-a2e0-3af57661a9d4
dc.identifier000330037800005
dc.identifier84921954035
dc.identifier.citationVigoder , F D M , Ritchie , M G , Gibson , G & Peixoto , A A 2013 , ' Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors ' , Memorias do instituto oswaldo cruz , vol. 108 , no. Supplement 1 , pp. 26-33 . https://doi.org/10.1590/0074-0276130390en
dc.identifier.issn0074-0276
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-7913-8675/work/46761130
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/5032
dc.description.abstractAcoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound "signatures" may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e. g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.
dc.format.extent8
dc.format.extent734712
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMemorias do instituto oswaldo cruzen
dc.subjectSandfliesen
dc.subjectMosquitoesen
dc.subjectTriatominesen
dc.subjectTsetseen
dc.subjectLutzomyia-longipalpis dipteraen
dc.subjectGlossina-morsitans-morsitansen
dc.subjectTriatoma-infestans hemipteraen
dc.subjectAnopheles-gambiaeen
dc.subjectSexual-behavioren
dc.subjectAedes-aegyptien
dc.subjectSound productionen
dc.subjectMolecular-formsen
dc.subjectReproductive isolationen
dc.subjectCourtship songen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleAcoustic communication in insect disease vectorsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1590/0074-0276130390
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0074-02762013000900026&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=enen


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