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dc.contributor.authorGruber, Thibaud
dc.contributor.authorZuberbuehler, Klaus
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-10T14:31:02Z
dc.date.available2014-07-10T14:31:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-25
dc.identifier.citationGruber , T & Zuberbuehler , K 2013 , ' Vocal recruitment for joint travel in wild chimpanzees ' , PLoS ONE , vol. 8 , no. 9 , e76073 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0076073en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 131080211
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e1b854a7-2015-49a3-875e-0bf4c560771c
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000325218700120
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84884581336
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8378-088X/work/64360631
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5004
dc.descriptionThe study was funded by the Leverhulme Trust (UK) with additional support by the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, the European Research Council and the Fyssen Foundation during the writing of this article.en
dc.description.abstractJoint travel is a common social activity of many group-living animals, which requires some degree of coordination, sometimes through communication signals. Here, we studied the use of an acoustically distinct vocalisation in chimpanzees, the 'travel hoo', a signal given specifically in the travel context. We were interested in how this call type was produced to coordinate travel, whether it was aimed at specific individuals and how recipients responded. We found that 'travel hoos' were regularly given prior to impending departures and that silent travel initiations were less successful in recruiting than vocal initiations. Other behaviours associated with departure were unrelated to recruitment, suggesting that 'travel hoos' facilitated joint travel. Crucially, 'travel hoos' were more often produced in the presence of allies than other individuals, with high rates of recruitment success. We discuss these findings as evidence for how motivation to perform a specific social activity can lead to the production of a vocal signal that qualifies as 'intentional' according to most definitions, suggesting that a key psychological component of human language may have already been present in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans.
dc.format.extent9
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2013 Gruber et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectPan-troglodytes-schweinfurthiien
dc.subjectUse copulation callsen
dc.subjectReferential gesturesen
dc.subjectBudongo foresten
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectCommunityen
dc.subjectBehavioren
dc.subjectScreamsen
dc.subjectUgandaen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titleVocal recruitment for joint travel in wild chimpanzeesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0076073
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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