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dc.contributor.authorBlackwood, Leda Moore
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Nick
dc.contributor.authorReicher, Stephen David
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-18T15:01:00Z
dc.date.available2014-04-18T15:01:00Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationBlackwood , L M , Hopkins , N & Reicher , S D 2013 , ' I know who I am, but who do they think I am? Muslim perspectives on encounters with airport authorities. ' , Ethnic and Racial Studies , vol. 36 , no. 6 , pp. 1090-1108 . https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2011.645845en
dc.identifier.issn0141-9870
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 16873211
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: bdf7b54b-d0de-463d-888c-e0770b4b029e
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84879042561
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/4574
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we report an analysis of individual and group interviews with thirty-eight Scottish Muslims concerning their encounters with authority – especially those at airports. Our analysis shows that a key theme in interviewees’ talk of their experience in this context concerns the denial and misrecognition of valued identities such as being British, being respectable and being Muslim. One reason why such experiences are so problematic concerns the denial of agency associated with being positioned in terms that are not one's own. The implications of these findings for understanding the dynamics of intergroup relations are discussed.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEthnic and Racial Studiesen
dc.rightsCopyright 2012, Taylor and Francis. This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article whose final and definitive form, the Version of Record, has been published in Ethnic and Racial Studies (2013) Vol 36, Issue 1, pp. 190-1108 and is available online from Taylor and Francis at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2011.645845en
dc.subjectMuslimsen
dc.subjectSocial Identitiesen
dc.subjectNational identityen
dc.subjectSocial exclusionen
dc.subjectBorder surveillanceen
dc.subjectBelongingen
dc.titleI know who I am, but who do they think I am? Muslim perspectives on encounters with airport authorities.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPreprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.St Andrews Sustainability Instituteen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2011.645845
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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