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dc.contributor.authorHall, Zachary J.
dc.contributor.authorBertin, Marion
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Ida E.
dc.contributor.authorMeddle, Simone L.
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Susan D.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-11T12:01:03Z
dc.date.available2014-04-11T12:01:03Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-01
dc.identifier.citationHall , Z J , Bertin , M , Bailey , I E , Meddle , S L & Healy , S D 2014 , ' Neural correlates of nesting behavior in zebra finches ( Taeniopygia guttata ) ' , Behavioural Brain Research , vol. 264 , pp. 26-33 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2014.01.043en
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 109817254
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b98568bb-fb10-416a-9702-d1979e1f18b7
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84896694636
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8059-4480/work/60631240
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000333853300004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/4565
dc.descriptionOpen Access funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.en
dc.description.abstractNest building in birds involves a behavioral sequence (nest material collection and deposition in the nest) that offers a unique model for addressing how the brain sequences motor actions. In this study, we identified brain regions involved in nesting behavior in male and female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We used Fos immunohistochemistry to quantify production of the immediate early gene protein product Fos (a molecular indicator of neuronal activity) in the brain correlated this expression with the variation in nesting behavior. Using this technique, we found that neural circuitry involved in motor sequencing, social behavior, reward and motivation were active during nesting. Within pairs of nesting birds, the number of times a male picked up or deposited nesting material and the amount of time a female spent in the nest explained the variation in Fos expression in the anterior motor pathway, social behavior network, and reward neural circuits. Identification of the brain regions that are involved in nesting enables us to begin studying the roles of motor sequencing, context, and reward in construction behavior at the neural level.
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioural Brain Researchen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2014, Elsevier. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectNesting behavioren
dc.subjectNest buildingen
dc.subjectC-fosen
dc.subjectAnterior motor pathwayen
dc.subjectZebra finchen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subjectR2Cen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleNeural correlates of nesting behavior in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2014.01.043
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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