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dc.contributor.authorHobaiter, Cat
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Richard William
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-28T13:01:07Z
dc.date.available2014-02-28T13:01:07Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationHobaiter , C & Byrne , R W 2013 , ' Laterality in the gestural communication of wild chimpanzees ' Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences , vol. 1288 , pp. 9-16 . https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.12041en
dc.identifier.issn0077-8923
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 55557607
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c64b6669-cc5f-420a-bc4f-e0abf8a78fc3
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84878837836
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-3893-0524/work/46125082
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-9862-9373/work/60630539
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/4481
dc.description.abstracte examined hand preference in the intentional gestural communication of wild chimpanzees in the Budongo forest, Uganda. Individuals showed some tendency to be lateralized, although less than has been reported for begging and pointing gestures in captivity; on average, their absolute bias was around 0.25 (where 1.0 represents complete right- or left-hand use and 0.0 represents no bias). Lateralization was incomplete even in individuals with major manual disabilities. Where individuals had a stronger preference, this was more often toward the right hand; moreover, as age increased, the direction (but not the extent) of hand preference shifted toward the right. While the gestural repertoire as a whole was largely employed ambilateraly, object-manipulation gestures showed a strong right-hand bias.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciencesen
dc.rightsThis is an author version of this article. The published version © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences is available from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.comen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titleLaterality in the gestural communication of wild chimpanzeesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPreprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.12041
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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