Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorMacQueen, Daniel John
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Ian Alistair
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-26T10:31:01Z
dc.date.available2014-02-26T10:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationMacQueen , D J & Johnston , I A 2014 , ' A well-constrained estimate for the timing of the salmonid whole genome duplication reveals major decoupling from species diversification ' Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , vol. 281 , no. 1778 , 20132881 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.2881en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 99618626
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: d2e6e6db-e47b-4d7d-9abe-72ccf1789bb0
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84900525383
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-7796-5754/work/47136022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/4466
dc.description.abstractWhole genome duplication (WGD) is often considered to be mechanistically associated with species diversification. Such ideas have been anecdotally attached to a WGD at the stem of the salmonid fish family, but remain untested. Here, we characterized an extensive set of gene paralogues retained from the salmonid WGD, in species covering the major lineages (subfamilies Salmoninae, Thymallinae and Coregoninae). By combining the data in calibrated relaxed molecular clock analyses, we provide the first well-constrained and direct estimate for the timing of the salmonid WGD. Our results suggest that the event occurred no later in time than 88 Ma and that 40–50 Myr passed subsequently until the subfamilies diverged. We also recovered a Thymallinae–Coregoninae sister relationship with maximal support. Comparative phylogenetic tests demonstrated that salmonid diversification patterns are closely allied in time with the continuous climatic cooling that followed the Eocene–Oligocene transition, with the highest diversification rates coinciding with recent ice ages. Further tests revealed considerably higher speciation rates in lineages that evolved anadromy—the physiological capacity to migrate between fresh and seawater—than in sister groups that retained the ancestral state of freshwater residency. Anadromy, which probably evolved in response to climatic cooling, is an established catalyst of genetic isolation, particularly during environmental perturbations (for example, glaciation cycles). We thus conclude that climate-linked ecophysiological factors, rather than WGD, were the primary drivers of salmonid diversification.
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.rights© 2014 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectWhole genome duplication (WGD)en
dc.subjectSpecies diversificationen
dc.subjectSalmonid fishen
dc.subjectClimate changeen
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.subjectAnadromyen
dc.subjectQ Scienceen
dc.subject.lccQen
dc.titleA well-constrained estimate for the timing of the salmonid whole genome duplication reveals major decoupling from species diversificationen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Scottish Oceans Instituteen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Marine Alliance for Science & Technology Scotlanden
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Research into Ecological & Environmental Modellingen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.2881
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record