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dc.contributor.authorAshe, Erin
dc.contributor.authorWray, Janie
dc.contributor.authorPicard, Christopher R.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-16T08:31:01Z
dc.date.available2013-09-16T08:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-11
dc.identifier.citationAshe , E , Wray , J , Picard , C R & Williams , R 2013 , ' Abundance and survival of Pacific humpback whales in a proposed critical habitat area ' , PLoS One , vol. 8 , no. 9 , e75228 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075228en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 69971802
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 5e40311b-ba55-41cf-9a1d-b8e30d483f79
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84907299902
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/4054
dc.descriptionThis research was funded through grants to Cetacealab and Gitga’at First Nation from Julie Walters and Sam Rose, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Cetacean Research Program, Species at Risk Program). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.description.abstractHumpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were hunted commercially in Canada's Pacific region until 1966. Depleted to an estimated 1,400 individuals throughout the North Pacific, humpback whales are listed as Threatened under Canada's Species at Risk Act (SARA) and Endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. We conducted an 8-year photo-identification study to monitor humpback whale usage of a coastal fjord system in British Columbia (BC), Canada that was recently proposed as candidate critical habitat for the species under SARA. This participatory research program built collaborations among First Nations, environmental non-governmental organizations and academics. The study site, including the territorial waters of Gitga'at First Nation, is an important summertime feeding destination for migratory humpback whales, but is small relative to the population's range. We estimated abundance and survivorship using mark-recapture methods using photographs of naturally marked individuals. Abundance of humpback whales in the region was large, relative to the site's size, and generally increased throughout the study period. The resulting estimate of adult survivorship (0.979, 95% CI: 0.914, 0.995) is at the high end of previously reported estimates. A high rate of resights provides new evidence for inter-annual site fidelity to these local waters. Habitat characteristics of our study area are considered ecologically significant and unique, and this should be considered as regulatory agencies consider proposals for high-volume crude oil and liquefied natural gas tanker traffic through the area. Monitoring population recovery of a highly mobile, migratory species is daunting for low-cost, community-led science. Focusing on a small, important subset of the animals' range can make this challenge more tractable. Given low statistical power and high variability, our community is considering simpler ecological indicators of population health, such as the number of individuals harmed or killed each year by human activities, including ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen
dc.rights© 2013 Ashe et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titleAbundance and survival of Pacific humpback whales in a proposed critical habitat areaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075228
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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