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dc.contributor.authorHahn, Allison
dc.contributor.authorGuillette, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorHoeschele, Marisa
dc.contributor.authorCook, Robert
dc.contributor.authorSturdy, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-14T12:31:01Z
dc.date.available2013-08-14T12:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.citationHahn , A , Guillette , L , Hoeschele , M , Cook , R & Sturdy , C 2013 , Categories, concepts, and calls : auditory perceptual mechanisms and cognitive abilities across different types of birds. in Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics . vol. 19 , Acoustical Society of America , Melville, New York , The 21st International Congress on Acoustics , Montreal , Canada , 2/07/13 . https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4806086en
dc.identifier.citationconferenceen
dc.identifier.isbn1939-800X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 52508657
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c7f6d86d-256c-4558-b05a-25bbaf1dff93
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84878955726
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/3961
dc.description.abstractAlthough involving different animals, preparations, and objectives, our laboratories (Sturdy's and Cook's) are mutually interested in category perception and concept formation. The Sturdy laboratory has a history of studying perceptual categories in songbirds, while Cook laboratory has a history of studying abstract concept formation in pigeons. Recently, we undertook a suite of collaborative projects to combine our investigations to examine abstract concept formation in songbirds, and perception of songbird vocalizations in pigeons. This talk will include our recent findings of songbird category perception, songbird abstract concept formation (same/different task), and early results from pigeons' processing of songbird vocalizations in a same/different task. Our findings indicate that (1) categorization in birds seems to be most heavily influenced by acoustic, rather than genetic or experiential factors (2) songbirds treat their vocalizations as perceptual categories, both at the level of the note and species/whole call, (3) chickadees, like pigeons, can perceive abstract, same-different relations, and (4) pigeons are not as good at discriminating chickadee vocalizations as songbirds (chickadees and finches). Our findings suggest that although there are commonalities in complex auditory processing among birds, there are potentially important comparative differences between songbirds and non-songbirds in their treatment of certain types of auditory objects.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of America
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of Meetings on Acousticsen
dc.rights© 2013 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America. The following article appeared in Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, Volume 19, and may be found at http://asadl.org/jasa/resource/1/jasman/v133/i5/p3442_s1en
dc.subjectCategory perceptionen
dc.subjectConcept formationen
dc.subjectAuditory objectsen
dc.subjectBird vocalisationsen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titleCategories, concepts, and calls : auditory perceptual mechanisms and cognitive abilities across different types of birds.en
dc.typeConference itemen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1121/1.4806086


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