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dc.contributor.authorTrafton, John
dc.coverage.spatial221en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-31T09:22:01Z
dc.date.available2013-05-31T09:22:01Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/3583
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, I argue that twenty-first century American war films are constructed in dialogue with the past, repurposing earlier forms of war representation by evoking the visual and narrative memory of the past that is embedded in genre form—what Mikhail Bakhtin calls 'genre memory.' Comparing post-9/11 war films with Vietnam War films, my project examines how contemporary war films envision war’s impact on culture and social space, explore how war refashions ideas about race and national identity, and re-imagine war’s rewriting of the human psyche. My research expands on earlier research and departs from traditional approaches to the war film genre by locating the American Civil War at the origin of this genre memory, and, in doing so, argues that nineteenth century documentation of the Civil War serves as a rehearsal for the twentieth and twenty-first century war film. Constructed in explicit relation to the Vietnam film, I argue that post-9/11 war films rehearse the history of war representation in American culture while also emphasizing the radically different culture of the present day. Rather than representing a departure from past forms of war representation, as has been argued by many theorists, I show that contemporary American war films can be seen as the latest chapter in a long history of reimagining American military and cultural history in pictorial and narrative form.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of St Andrews
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.subjectWar filmen_US
dc.subjectGenre memoryen_US
dc.subjectIraq Waren_US
dc.subjectAfghanistanen_US
dc.subjectVietnam Waren_US
dc.subjectDocumentary filmen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Civil Waren_US
dc.subjectWorld War II filmsen_US
dc.subjectPost 9/11 U.S. historyen_US
dc.subjectWar technologyen_US
dc.subjectWar representationen_US
dc.subjectPTSDen_US
dc.subjectHauntologyen_US
dc.subjectNational identityen_US
dc.subject.lccPN1995.9W3T8
dc.subject.lcshWar films--United States--History and criticismen_US
dc.subject.lcshAnti-war films--United States--History and criticismen_US
dc.subject.lcshFilm genres--United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshSeptember 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001--Influenceen_US
dc.titleGenre memory in the twenty-first century American war film : how post-9/11 American war cinema reinvents genre codes and notions of national identityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.publisher.institutionThe University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.rights.embargodatePrint and electronic copy restricted until 16th January 2018en_US
dc.rights.embargoreasonThesis restricted in accordance with University regulationsen_US


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
Except where otherwise noted within the work, this item's license for re-use is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported