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dc.contributor.authorStephen, Ian David
dc.contributor.authorCoetzee, Vinet
dc.contributor.authorLaw Smith, Miriam Jane
dc.contributor.authorPerrett, David Ian
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-26T16:01:01Z
dc.date.available2013-03-26T16:01:01Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-01
dc.identifier.citationStephen , I D , Coetzee , V , Law Smith , M J & Perrett , D I 2009 , ' Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human health ' , PLoS One , vol. 4 , no. 4 , e5083 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0005083en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 5334857
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 76e02ffc-b500-435c-a060-99ae27ecfbed
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 64249159111
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-6025-0939/work/64361031
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/3431
dc.descriptionI Stephen was funded by a BBSRC Studentship.en
dc.description.abstractSkin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen
dc.rights© 2009 Stephen et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectBF Psychologyen
dc.subject.lccBFen
dc.titleSkin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human healthen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0005083
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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