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dc.contributor.authorAbed Al Ahad, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2023-10-12T10:30:09Z
dc.date.available2023-10-12T10:30:09Z
dc.date.issued2023-10-11
dc.identifier294318004
dc.identifier0ff47325-7d8c-4e9f-ae43-91d21845f6f7
dc.identifier85173805326
dc.identifier.citationAbed Al Ahad , M 2023 , ' The association of long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution with all-cause GP visits and hospital admissions by ethnicity and country of birth in the United Kingdom ' , PLoS One , vol. 18 , no. 10 , e0275414 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0275414en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-9006-730X/work/144462205
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/28525
dc.descriptionFunding: The work presented in this paper was funded by the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) Saltire Early Career Fellowships grant (RSE Grant Reference Number: 1846).en
dc.description.abstractBackground Air pollution is associated with poor health. Yet, more research is needed to reveal the association of long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution with less studied health outcomes like hospital admissions and general-practitioner (GP) visits and whether this association is stronger for ethnic minorities compared to the rest of population. This study investigates the association between air pollution and all-cause GP visits and hospital admissions by ethnicity in the United-Kingdom (UK). Methods We used individual-level longitudinal data from the “UK Household Longitudinal Study” including 46,442 adult individuals who provided 140,466 responses across five years (2015–2019). This data was linked to yearly concentrations of NO2, SO2, and particulate-matter (PM10, PM2.5) outdoor pollution using the Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) of residence for each individual. Multilevel mixed-effects ordered logistic models were used to assess the association between air pollution and all-cause GP visits and hospital admissions. Results We found higher odds of hospital admissions per 1 μg/m3 increase in annual concentrations of NO2 (OR = 1.008; 95%CI = 1.004–1.012), SO2 (OR = 1.048; 95%CI = 1.014–1.083), PM10 (OR = 1.011; 95%CI = 1.003–1.018), and PM2.5 (OR = 1.018; 95%CI = 1.007–1.029) pollutants. Higher odds of GP visits were also observed with increased exposure to NO2 (OR = 1.010; 95%CI = 1.006–1.014) and SO2 (OR = 1.114; 95%CI = 1.077–1.152) pollutants. The observed associations did not differ across ethnic groups, but by country of birth, they were more pronounced in individuals born outside UK than those born in UK. Conclusion This study supports an association between higher exposure to outdoor air pollution and increased all-cause hospital admissions and GP visits. Further longitudinal studies with longer follow-up time periods may be able to reveal more definite conclusions on the influence of ethnicity on the association between long-term outdoor air pollution and both hospital admissions and GP visits.
dc.format.extent24
dc.format.extent951137
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen
dc.subjectG Geography (General)en
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subjectMCCen
dc.subject.lccG1en
dc.titleThe association of long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution with all-cause GP visits and hospital admissions by ethnicity and country of birth in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorThe Royal Society of Edinburghen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Population and Health Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0275414
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.grantnumber1846en


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