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dc.contributor.authorFierke, Karin Marie
dc.contributor.authorMackay, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-24T14:31:00Z
dc.date.available2023-07-24T14:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2023-07-22
dc.identifier288341574
dc.identifier29ba97c8-66e9-46a7-b280-b3d89f83480e
dc.identifier85165582221
dc.identifier.citationFierke , K M & Mackay , N 2023 , ' The safety paradox : unknown knowns, ungrieved grief and collective agreements not to know ' , International Relations , vol. OnlineFirst . https://doi.org/10.1177/00471178231187499en
dc.identifier.issn0047-1178
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/28010
dc.descriptionFunding: The article is part of a larger project, Mapping the Empire: The Contemporary Legacy of Historical Trauma and Forced Displacement, which has been funded by the U.S. Human Family Unity Foundation through a donation to the University of St. Andrews.en
dc.description.abstractThe discussion between the developing and developed world in Egypt during COP27 brought the history of colonialism and its impact on climate change to the table, as did the earlier floods in Pakistan. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of unacknowledged grief, shame and guilt, accruing over centuries, on our ability to move forward to a more sustainable future. At stake is not only a question of ‘loss and damage’ for those who have suffered disproportionately in the past and present, but also the need to acknowledge how past practice has set the stage for inequality and climate change in the global future. In this article we develop concepts of unknown knowns and ungrieved grief, and explore the mechanisms by which populations collectively turn away from uncomfortable or shameful truths. The failure to look at the past has transgenerational consequences, as present distractions contribute to an inability to ‘see’ the consequences of past and present action for future generations. The final section explores the safety paradox that arises from the fragmented safety of turning to conflict and war, and a holistic safety that requires grieving for the global whole.
dc.format.extent24
dc.format.extent385782
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Relationsen
dc.subjectTransgenerational entanglementsen
dc.subjectSecurity Dilemmaen
dc.subjectTraumatic memoryen
dc.subjectGriefen
dc.subjectColonialism and climate changeen
dc.subjectT-DASen
dc.subjectSDG 13 - Climate Actionen
dc.subjectSDG 16 - Peace, Justice and Strong Institutionsen
dc.titleThe safety paradox : unknown knowns, ungrieved grief and collective agreements not to knowen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorHuman Family Unity Foundationen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of International Relationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/00471178231187499
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.grantnumberen


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