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dc.contributor.authorMoreras-Marti, A.
dc.contributor.authorFox-Powell, M.
dc.contributor.authorCousins, C. R.
dc.contributor.authorMacey, M. C.
dc.contributor.authorZerkle, A.L.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-26T16:30:05Z
dc.date.available2022-08-26T16:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-04
dc.identifier.citationMoreras-Marti , A , Fox-Powell , M , Cousins , C R , Macey , M C & Zerkle , A L 2022 , ' Sulfur isotopes as biosignatures for Mars and Europa exploration ' , Journal of the Geological Society , vol. 79 , no. 6 , jgs2021-134 . https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2021-134en
dc.identifier.issn0016-7649
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 280180357
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 01fe16c5-7e4b-4cb7-9741-bc383f524a0c
dc.identifier.otherJisc: 392387
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000868437100001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/25898
dc.descriptionC Cousins and A Zerkle wish to acknowledge The Leverhulme Trust (RPG- 2019-353) and the UK Space Agency/STFC (ST/P001270/1), who funded this work.en
dc.description.abstractSulfur (S) isotopes are used to trace metabolic pathways associated with biological S-cycling in past and present environments on Earth. These pathways (sulfate reduction, sulfur disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) can produce unique S isotope signals that provide insight into biogeochemical S-cycling. The S cycle is also relevant for extraterrestrial environments and processes. On early Mars, sulfur existed in different redox states and was involved in a large range of surface processes (e.g., volcanic, atmospheric, hydrothermal, and aqueous brines). Sulfur compounds have also been detected on Europa's icy moon surface, with the S cycle implicated in Europa's surface and ocean geochemistry. Given the well-established utility of S isotopes in providing a record for past life on Earth, S isotopes are an valuable tool for identifying biosignatures on Mars and Europa. Here, we review S isotopes as a biosignature, in light of two recent advances in understanding the S cycle in both Mars and Europa: (i) the measurements of δ34S in situ at Gale Crater and quadruple S isotopes (QSI) in Martian meteorites, and (ii) the identification of a likely exogenous origin of sulfur on Europa's surface. We discuss important considerations for unravelling QSI biosignatures in Martian environments, considering high and low sulfur environments, atmospheric S-MIF signals, and metabolic energy-limited niches. For Europa, we describe the potential for S isotopes to probe biogeochemistry, and identify key knowledge gaps to be addressed in order to unlock S isotopic tools for future life detection efforts. The resulting picture demonstrates how S isotopes will be a valuable tool for Mars Sample Return, and how future missions can focus on the search for environments where QSI signatures of microbial S-cycling processes have a greater chance of being preserved. For Europa, the first step will be to account for the S isotope composition of the various S pools, to recognise or rule out non-biologically mediated S isotope values, with a focus on experimental examination of potential S isotope signatures from exogenous sulfur sources.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Geological Societyen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 The Author(s). Published by The Geological Society of London. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.subjectQE Geologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccQEen
dc.titleSulfur isotopes as biosignatures for Mars and Europa explorationen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.contributor.sponsorThe Leverhulme Trusten
dc.contributor.sponsorScience & Technology Facilities Councilen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. St Andrews Centre for Exoplanet Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Earth & Environmental Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Earth and Environmental Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. St Andrews Isotope Geochemistryen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2021-134
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.grantnumberRPG-2019-353en
dc.identifier.grantnumberST/P001270/1en


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