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dc.contributor.authorNethercott, Frances
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-25T11:30:03Z
dc.date.available2022-05-25T11:30:03Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-01
dc.identifier277401070
dc.identifierf5b75298-a6ec-47de-ad34-a7bc424dfd32
dc.identifier85130848014
dc.identifier000800633300003
dc.identifier.citationNethercott , F 2022 , ' The intelligentsia is dead, long live the intelligentsia! Alexander Solzhenitsyn on soviet dissidence and a new spiritual elite ' , Russian Literature , vol. 130 , pp. 29-50 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ruslit.2022.03.002en
dc.identifier.issn0304-3479
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-3375-6712/work/111547293
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/25449
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the peculiar intermeshing of continuity and discontinuity in Russian culture through the prism of Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s essay, 'Obrazovanshchina' ('The Smatterers'). Written in 1974 for the collective volume Iz-pod glyb (From Under the Rubble), Solzhenitsyn drew on arguments advanced by contributors to the famous pre-revolutionary work, Vekhi (Landmarks, 1909), both as a polemical tool to distance himself from his immediate contemporary rivals and as a template in his bid to establish a new spiritual elite in Brezhnev’s Soviet Russia. This article suggests that if one intention of Solzhenitsyn’s essay was to declare an irrevocable break with the culture of the pre-revolutionary intelligentsia tradition, the discursive tools he used to do this (intertextual devices, ad hominem polemics, selective historical and ideological narratives) remained firmly anchored within that tradition.
dc.format.extent22
dc.format.extent406908
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofRussian Literatureen
dc.subjectSolzhenitsynen
dc.subjectIz-pod glyben
dc.subjectVekhien
dc.subjectNeo-Westernizersen
dc.subjectRussophilesen
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectPG Slavic, Baltic, Albanian languages and literatureen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subjectACen
dc.subjectMCCen
dc.subject.lccPGen
dc.titleThe intelligentsia is dead, long live the intelligentsia! : Alexander Solzhenitsyn on soviet dissidence and a new spiritual eliteen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. St Andrews Institute for Transnational & Spatial Historyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Historyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ruslit.2022.03.002
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2022-05-19


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