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dc.contributor.authorKadereita, Joachim W.
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-17T12:30:02Z
dc.date.available2022-01-17T12:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-12
dc.identifier.citationKadereita , J W & Abbott , R 2022 , ' Plant speciation in the Quaternary ' , Plant Ecology & Diversity , vol. 14 , no. 3-4 , pp. 105-142 . https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2021.2012849en
dc.identifier.issn1755-0874
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 276904235
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: def3bf14-3448-4e2e-969c-7ee228b962e1
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000741833200001
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85122812046
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/24675
dc.description.abstractBackground : There are conflicting views between palaeobotanists and plant systematists / evolutionary biologists regarding the occurrence of plant speciation in the Quaternary. Palaeobotanists advocate that Quaternary speciation was rare despite opposing molecular phylogenetic evidence, the extent of which appears underappreciated. Aims : To document, describe and discuss evidence for Quaternary plant speciation across different geographical regions based on dated molecular phylogenies and related studies. Methods : From a search of the literature we compiled a selection mainly of dated molecular phylogenies from all continents (except Antarctica) and from all major climate zones. Results : Molecular phylogenetic analyses and related studies show that Quaternary plant speciation and radiations occurred frequently and that in many instances Quaternary climatic oscillations were likely important drivers of them. In all geographical regions studied Quaternary plant speciation and radiations were particularly evident in mountainous areas and arid regions, and were also prevalent on all major oceanic archipelagos. Conclusions : Based on our survey of the molecular phylogenetic and related literature we propose there is now overwhelming evidence that plant speciation and radiations were ubiquitous during the Quaternary. We therefore reject the view of palaeobotanists that plant speciation was rare during this period and briefly discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.
dc.format.extent38
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPlant Ecology & Diversityen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/bync-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.en
dc.subjectQuaternaryen
dc.subjectSpeciationen
dc.subjectClimatic oscillationsen
dc.subjectMolecular phylogeniesen
dc.subjectPalaeobotanyen
dc.subjectPlant evolutionen
dc.subjectPlant radiationsen
dc.subjectPleistoceneen
dc.subjectQK Botanyen
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subjectNISen
dc.subject.lccQKen
dc.titlePlant speciation in the Quaternaryen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2021.2012849
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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