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dc.contributor.authorCosta Buranelli, Filippo
dc.contributor.authorTaeuber, Simon F.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-07T10:30:05Z
dc.date.available2022-01-07T10:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-19
dc.identifier.citationCosta Buranelli , F & Taeuber , S F 2022 , ' The English School and Global IR - a research agenda ' , All Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peace , vol. 11 , no. 1 , pp. 87-105 . https://doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.1020713en
dc.identifier.issn2146-7757
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 273777770
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 23aca7c0-6b8a-4157-9883-ee739a1da28e
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85126666698
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-2447-7618/work/105007212
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-0740-3366/work/105007263
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000747139300005
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85126666698
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/24617
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the different ways in which the English School of International Relations (ES) can contribute to the broader Global IR research agenda. After identifying some of the shared concerns between the ES and Global IR, such as the emphasis placed on history and culture, the paper proceeds with discussing what the authors believe to be the areas in which the ES can align itself more closely with the ideas and values underpinning Global IR: a more thorough engagement with the origins of global international society rooted in dispossession, violence, and colonialism; a more localised and diverse understanding of ‘society’; a sharper and more grounded conceptualisation of ‘the state’ as a basic ontology; an embracement of the interpretivist principle of charity; and a problematisation of assumptions of ‘globality’ of international society. The paper concludes with a tentative research agenda, emphasising the value of fieldwork, local practices and languages, archives, and a theorisation of international society that is grounded in the very social contexts being investigated.
dc.format.extent19
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAll Azimuth: A Journal of Foreign Policy and Peaceen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 the Author. This work has been made available online in accordance with publisher policies or with permission. Permission for further reuse of this content should be sought from the publisher or the rights holder. This is the final published version of the work, which was originally published at https://doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.1020713.en
dc.subjectEnglish Schoolen
dc.subjectEurocentrismen
dc.subjectGlobal IRen
dc.subjectGounded theoryen
dc.subjectLocalityen
dc.subjectJZ International relationsen
dc.subjectLB2300 Higher Educationen
dc.subjectPolitical Science and International Relationsen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subjectSDG 16 - Peace, Justice and Strong Institutionsen
dc.subject.lccJZen
dc.subject.lccLB2300en
dc.titleThe English School and Global IR - a research agendaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Global Law and Governanceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of International Relationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.20991/allazimuth.1020713
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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