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dc.contributor.authorHerdman, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-21T00:38:29Z
dc.date.available2021-11-21T00:38:29Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-21
dc.identifier265771972
dc.identifierdbf4d44d-b0b9-4fd8-b274-83ae7bd3330e
dc.identifier85098483591
dc.identifier000600609100001
dc.identifier.citationHerdman , E 2020 , ' Piercing proverbial crows' eyes : theft and publication in Renaissance France ' , Renaissance and Reformation , vol. 43 , no. 3 , pp. 9-40 . https://doi.org/10.33137/rr.v43i3.35300en
dc.identifier.issn0034-429X
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-4494-9042/work/85855625
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/24375
dc.description.abstractThe ironic Latin proverb “cornicum oculos configere” was classically illustrated by the example of Gnaeus Flavius, celebrated for his theft and valuable but unauthorized publication of Rome’s legal secrets. Erasmus’s discussion of the proverb in the Adages consequently focuses on the tension within the transfer of knowledge between openness and secrecy, and on the fragile status of intellectual authority within a scholarly domain made increasingly public by the printing press. This article uses the example of Flavius to trace the idea of theft within Renaissance attitudes to the possession and dissemination of knowledge. It compares the reception of Flavius in three contexts: Erasmus’s ambivalence towards publication as a form of theft in the Adages; ancient criticisms of theft as social presumption; and the more positive representation of epistemological theft in the works of four Renaissance French jurists. It thus argues that Erasmus represents a turning point both in the reception history of Flavius and in attitudes to intellectual theft—and thereby to intellectual property—in the Renaissance.
dc.format.extent241859
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofRenaissance and Reformationen
dc.subjectP Language and Literatureen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subjectR2Cen
dc.subject.lccPen
dc.titlePiercing proverbial crows' eyes : theft and publication in Renaissance Franceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Frenchen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for the Public Understanding of Greek and Roman Dramaen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.33137/rr.v43i3.35300
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2021-11-21


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