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dc.contributor.authorHill, T. C.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, M.
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, F. I.
dc.contributor.authorMoncrieff, J. B.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-06T11:31:03Z
dc.date.available2012-03-06T11:31:03Z
dc.date.issued2011-07
dc.identifier.citationHill , T C , Williams , M , Woodward , F I & Moncrieff , J B 2011 , ' Constraining ecosystem processes from tower fluxes and atmospheric profiles ' Ecological Applications , vol. 21 , no. 5 , pp. 1474-1489 . DOI: 10.1890/09-0840.1en
dc.identifier.issn1051-0761
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 17178902
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 6c560d31-b211-425b-b575-9ca76e00ceac
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000292766100005
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 79960347218
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/2406
dc.description.abstractThe planetary boundary layer (PBL) provides an important link between the scales and processes resolved by global atmospheric sampling/modeling and site-based flux measurements. The PBL is in direct contact with the land surface, both driving and responding to ecosystem processes. Measurements within the PBL (e. g., by radiosondes, aircraft profiles, and flask measurements) have a footprint, and thus an integrating scale, on the order of; similar to 1-100 km. We use the coupled atmosphere-biosphere model (CAB) and a Bayesian data assimilation framework to investigate the amount of biosphere process information that can be inferred from PBL measurements. We investigate the information content of PBL measurements in a two-stage study. First, we demonstrate consistency between the coupled model (CAB) and measurements, by comparing the model to eddy covariance flux tower measurements (i.e., water and carbon fluxes) and also PBL scalar profile measurements (i.e., water, carbon dioxide, and temperature) from Canadian boreal forest. Second, we use the CAB model in a set of Bayesian inversions experiments using synthetic data for a single day. In the synthetic experiment, leaf area and respiration were relatively well constrained, whereas surface albedo and plant hydraulic conductance were only moderately constrained. Finally, the abilities of the PBL profiles and the eddy covariance data to constrain the parameters were largely similar and only slightly lower than the combination of both observations.en
dc.format.extent16en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Applicationsen
dc.rights(c) 2011 by the Ecological Society of Americaen
dc.subjectAircraft observationsen
dc.subjectBoreal foresten
dc.subjectBoreasen
dc.subjectCarbon budgeten
dc.subjectEcosystem modelen
dc.subjectEddy covarianceen
dc.subjectPlanetary boundary layeren
dc.subjectProductivityen
dc.subjectTranspirationen
dc.subjectEddy covariance measurementsen
dc.subjectBlack spruce foresten
dc.subjectCarbon-dioxideen
dc.subjectBoundary-layeren
dc.subjectStomatal conductanceen
dc.subjectSurface fluxesen
dc.subjectWater-vaporen
dc.subjectModelen
dc.subjectCO2en
dc.subjectGE Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subject.lccGEen
dc.titleConstraining ecosystem processes from tower fluxes and atmospheric profilesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Earth and Environmental Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1890/09-0840.1
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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