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dc.contributor.authorKamusella, Tomasz
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-13T23:39:24Z
dc.date.available2021-08-13T23:39:24Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-14
dc.identifier.citationKamusella , T 2020 , ' Between politics and objectivity : the non -remembrance of the 1989 ethnic cleansing of Turks in communist Bulgaria ' , Journal of Genocide Research , vol. Latest Articles . https://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2020.1726649en
dc.identifier.issn1462-3528
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 266528903
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 16f5dfe8-b76d-446c-b648-c3b5e99fda54
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-3484-8352/work/69835230
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000515364000001
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85092507081
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/23778
dc.description.abstractCold War Europe’s largest and most intensive act of ethnic cleansing, namely, the 1989 expulsion of Turks from communist Bulgaria, remains a neglected subject three decades on after the event. When it took place, the term “ethnic cleansing” had not been invented yet, so in light of international law this expulsion was a “population transfer.” Population transfers (even unilateral) were deemed legal until the mid-1990s. Subsequently, under the influence of the atrocities committed during the wars of Yugoslav succession, population transfers were criminalized and relabelled as “ethnic cleansings.” For a variety of reasons, the 1989 Ethnic Cleansing has been also neglected by scholars and politicians in both, Bulgaria and Turkey. The neglect continues to this day, despite the Bulgarian Parliament’s momentous 2012 Declaration, which officially recognized the expulsion as an act of ethnic cleansing. This Declaration – which could become a basis for successful Turkish-Bulgarian reconciliation – largely remains unknown in both countries, while the propagandistic terminology employed for referring to the 1989 Ethnic Cleansing deepens the oblivion and obfuscates the nature of this tragic event. Both, in Turkish and Bulgarian, official and scholarly terminology employed suggests – incorrectly – that it was a “kind of emigration.”
dc.format.extent19
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Genocide Researchen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Informa UK Ltd, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This work has been made available online in accordance with publisher policies or with permission. Permission for further reuse of this content should be sought from the publisher or the rights holder. This is the author created accepted manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2020.1726649en
dc.subject1989 Ethnic cleanisngen
dc.subjectBulgariaen
dc.subjectBulgarian Turksen
dc.subjectBulgarian Muslimsen
dc.subjectExpulsionen
dc.subjectTerminologyen
dc.subjectTurkeyen
dc.subjectDK Russia. Soviet Union. Former Soviet Republicsen
dc.subjectDJK Eastern Europeen
dc.subjectDS Asiaen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccDKen
dc.subject.lccDJKen
dc.subject.lccDSen
dc.titleBetween politics and objectivity : the non-remembrance of the 1989 ethnic cleansing of Turks in communist Bulgariaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Historyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.St Andrews Institute for Transnational & Spatial Historyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2020.1726649
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2021-08-14


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