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dc.contributor.authorLofters, A. K.
dc.contributor.authorO’Brien, M. A.
dc.contributor.authorSutradhar, R.
dc.contributor.authorPinto, A. D.
dc.contributor.authorBaxter, N. N.
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, P.
dc.contributor.authorElliott, R.
dc.contributor.authorGlazier, R. H.
dc.contributor.authorHuizinga, J.
dc.contributor.authorKyle, R.
dc.contributor.authorManca, D. M.
dc.contributor.authorPietrusiak, M. A.
dc.contributor.authorRabeneck, L.
dc.contributor.authorRiordan, B.
dc.contributor.authorSelby, P.
dc.contributor.authorSivayoganathan, K.
dc.contributor.authorSnider, C.
dc.contributor.authorSopcak, N.
dc.contributor.authorThorpe, K.
dc.contributor.authorTinmouth, J.
dc.contributor.authorWall, B.
dc.contributor.authorZuo, F.
dc.contributor.authorGrunfeld, E.
dc.contributor.authorPaszat, L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-03T15:30:03Z
dc.date.available2021-08-03T15:30:03Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-03
dc.identifier.citationLofters , A K , O’Brien , M A , Sutradhar , R , Pinto , A D , Baxter , N N , Donnelly , P , Elliott , R , Glazier , R H , Huizinga , J , Kyle , R , Manca , D M , Pietrusiak , M A , Rabeneck , L , Riordan , B , Selby , P , Sivayoganathan , K , Snider , C , Sopcak , N , Thorpe , K , Tinmouth , J , Wall , B , Zuo , F , Grunfeld , E & Paszat , L 2021 , ' Building on existing tools to improve chronic disease prevention and screening in public health : a cluster randomized trial ' , BMC Public Health , vol. 21 , 1496 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-11452-xen
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 275307466
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 0123f9fa-a4d4-4a78-a63b-f8bbf87f820d
dc.identifier.otherRIS: urn:213D202C007B9D19DA0DE73DA4919C79
dc.identifier.otherRIS: Lofters2021
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000683721700003
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85111958858
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/23704
dc.descriptionThis study was funded as a grant proposal entitled ‘Advancing Cancer Prevention Among Deprived Neighbourhoods’ by the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute grant #704042 and by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research Institute of Cancer grant OCP #145450. AL is supported by a CIHR New Investigator Award, and as Chair in Implementation Science at the Peter Gilgan Centre for Women’s Cancers at Women’s College Hospital in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society.en
dc.description.abstractBackground The BETTER (Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Primary Care) intervention was designed to integrate the approach to chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care and demonstrated effective in a previous randomized trial. Methods We tested the effectiveness of the BETTER HEALTH intervention, a public health adaptation of BETTER, at improving participation in chronic disease prevention and screening actions for residents of low-income neighbourhoods in a cluster randomized trial, with ten low-income neighbourhoods in Durham Region Ontario randomized to immediate intervention vs. wait-list. The unit of analysis was the individual, and eligible participants were adults age 40–64 years residing in the neighbourhoods. Public health nurses trained as “prevention practitioners” held one prevention-focused visit with each participant. They provided participants with a tailored prevention prescription and supported them to set health-related goals. The primary outcome was a composite index: the number of evidence-based actions achieved at six months as a proportion of those for which participants were eligible at baseline. Results Of 126 participants (60 in immediate arm; 66 in wait-list arm), 125 were included in analyses (1 participant withdrew consent). In both arms, participants were eligible for a mean of 8.6 actions at baseline. At follow-up, participants in the immediate intervention arm met 64.5% of actions for which they were eligible versus 42.1% in the wait-list arm (rate ratio 1.53 [95% confidence interval 1.22–1.84]). Conclusion Public health nurses using the BETTER HEALTH intervention led to a higher proportion of identified evidence-based prevention and screening actions achieved at six months for people living with socioeconomic disadvantage.
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s). 2021 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.en
dc.subjectRA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicineen
dc.subjectE-DASen
dc.subject.lccRA0421en
dc.titleBuilding on existing tools to improve chronic disease prevention and screening in public health : a cluster randomized trialen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Medicineen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-11452-x
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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