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dc.contributor.authorKyriakides , Theodoros
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-07T23:45:20Z
dc.date.available2021-06-07T23:45:20Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-08
dc.identifier.citationKyriakides , T & Irvine , R 2019 , ' Not-knowing magic : magical memory and ineffability in Cyprus and Orkney ' , Ethnos , vol. Latest Articles . https://doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2019.1697336en
dc.identifier.issn0014-1844
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 263351605
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f5853cf5-4a4e-46f7-8ec1-9d1fb72af4ed
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85076426919
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000501389100001
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-0468-4510/work/90112683
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/23331
dc.description.abstractOur research explores the modern status of magic in two different European island settings: Cyprus and Orkney. By historically and ethnographically addressing the gradual dissolution of magical traditions in our respective fieldsites, our aim is to explore the means and instances by which magic continues to manifest in narratives and everyday practices. By exploring the current epistemological and social standing attributed to magic in Cyprus and Orkney societies, we wish to enrich anthropological understandings of the manner by which magic emerges from the conditions of unknowing that permeate processes of modernity whilst nevertheless remaining external to it. We approach such objectives by critiquing the implicit suggestion contained, but often not articulated or theorised within anthropological literature, that humans ‘know’ magic. Through our ethnography, we attempt to show that magic in these two islands does not persist through the ability of people to understand or rationalise magic as a thing of the past, but rather emerges through an awareness of historical, social, and cognitive incompleteness, accumulated and contained within dormant magical memory. We hence wish to identify and further theorise a central, modern tenet of magic: the unknowability contained and nourished in social and cognitive processes, through which the possibility - future and past - of magic is thought of and narrated in disenchanted worlds. As we suggest, not-knowing, in such sense, does not merely signal lack of knowledge but a mode of thinking and modernity specific to Cypriot and Orcadian modernity.
dc.format.extent21
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEthnosen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This work has been made available online in accordance with publisher policies or with permission. Permission for further reuse of this content should be sought from the publisher or the rights holder. This is the author created accepted manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2019.1697336en
dc.subjectMagicen
dc.subjectModernityen
dc.subjectDisenchantmenten
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.subjectKnowledgeen
dc.subjectGN Anthropologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGNen
dc.titleNot-knowing magic : magical memory and ineffability in Cyprus and Orkneyen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Social Anthropologyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2019.1697336
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2021-06-08


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