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dc.contributor.authorJones, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-02T23:41:17Z
dc.date.available2021-05-02T23:41:17Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationJones , C 2020 , ' Contesting within Order? China, socialisation, and international practice ' , Cambridge Review of International Affairs , vol. 33 , no. 1 , pp. 105-133 . https://doi.org/10.1080/09557571.2019.1674781en
dc.identifier.issn0955-7571
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 260333869
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: cd495df5-9a11-4266-9e12-25c0b0b058fd
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85074788025
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-4049-1003/work/76387231
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000493867100001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/23108
dc.descriptionFunding: Korea Foundation [grant numbet 1024-1134].en
dc.description.abstractDebates on China’s engagement with international institutions centre on a (false) dichotomy that China is either a status-quo or revisionist power. Both sides of this debate have ample empirical evidence to support their arguments and they tend towards conclusions that China’s behaviour and preferences lie in the space in between these two positions. It is important to consider how China presents a contest to international order from with international institutions. This article examines the question: What is China being socialised into? Drawing on the international practices literature, this paper unpacks the types of norms that China may be being socialised into. It makes the argument that China has been successfully socialised into the practices of international institutions – the ways the bureaucracies work and can be used to achieve political goals – and pluralist-liberal global norms, but incompletely into solidarist liberal norms.
dc.format.extent29
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCambridge Review of International Affairsen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Department of Politics and International Studies . This work has been made available online in accordance with publisher policies or with permission. Permission for further reuse of this content should be sought from the publisher or the rights holder. This is the author created accepted manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1080/09557571.2019.1674781en
dc.subjectChinaen
dc.subjectInternational orderen
dc.subjectInternational practiceen
dc.subjectSanctionsen
dc.subjectNorth Koreaen
dc.subjectJZ International relationsen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccJZen
dc.titleContesting within Order? China, socialisation, and international practiceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of International Relationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/09557571.2019.1674781
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2021-05-03


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