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dc.contributor.authorFinney, Nissa
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-06T15:30:03Z
dc.date.available2021-01-06T15:30:03Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-14
dc.identifier270345387
dc.identifier36b6624a-b95c-46e8-8795-1fd7dae438dd
dc.identifier85090929209
dc.identifier000570175600001
dc.identifier.citationFinney , N 2020 , ' Population geography I : epistemological opportunities of mixed methods ' , Progress in Human Geography , vol. OnlineFirst . https://doi.org/10.1177/0309132520955236en
dc.identifier.issn0309-1325
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-6602-9920/work/80995420
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/21227
dc.description.abstractPopulation geography is rightly recognised for its quantitative expertise. Yet, the methodological and epistemological diversification that has taken place within the sub-discipline alongside decades of theoretical developments has gone largely undiscussed. In this report, I suggest that population geography is methodologically multilingual and thus well placed to embrace mixed methods. This would bring epistemological opportunities for population geographers, advancing the sub-discipline and engagement beyond in academia and elsewhere. The confluence of theoretical and methodological developments, and global challenges that demand attention of population scholars, means the time is ripe to broaden the lens of population geographies through deliberate pursuit of mixed methods agendas.
dc.format.extent9
dc.format.extent209679
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofProgress in Human Geographyen
dc.subjectCritical quantitative social scienceen
dc.subjectEpistemologyen
dc.subjectInterdisciplinarityen
dc.subjectMethodological multilingualismen
dc.subjectMixed methodsen
dc.subjectG Geography. Anthropology. Recreationen
dc.subjectGeography, Planning and Developmenten
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGen
dc.titlePopulation geography I : epistemological opportunities of mixed methodsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Minorities Research (CMR)en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0309132520955236
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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