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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Ross
dc.contributor.authorKalafsky, Ronald V.
dc.contributor.authorMawson, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Lori
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-14T10:30:01Z
dc.date.available2020-12-14T10:30:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-13
dc.identifier.citationBrown , R , Kalafsky , R V , Mawson , S & Davis , L 2020 , ' Shocks, uncertainty and regional resilience : the case of Brexit and Scottish SMEs ' , Local Economy , vol. OnlineFirst . https://doi.org/10.1177/0269094220979261en
dc.identifier.issn0269-0942
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 271288466
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: fa9d5971-8603-452a-b324-a3fe808e4683
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-6164-7639/work/85567157
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85097527831
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000599544700001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/21140
dc.description.abstractRegional resilience is a topic of growing academic and policymaker interest. This paper empirically examines this concept by scrutinising the impact of Brexit on Scottish small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Given their crucial importance for the Scottish economy, SMEs are a good “unit of analysis” and a powerful barometer for measuring regional resilience. The research adopted a novel mixed methods approach examining the Longitudinal Small Business Survey together with in-depth interviews with SMEs. It is clear from the survey analysis that certain types of SMEs (i.e. innovators and exporters) were disproportionately fearful of Brexit. This was firmly corroborated by the interview data which found these same firms to be the most detrimentally impacted, manifesting in reductions in employment, exports and innovation. In contrast, the majority of domestically focused, less innovative SMEs were much less concerned and less negatively affected. While a small minority managed to deploy adjustment mechanisms to mitigate these negative effects, overall many firms had major difficulties operationally and strategically coping with this uncertain and turbulent environment. The findings suggest proactive public policies will be needed to help mitigate the difficulties caused by Brexit for certain types of SMEs.
dc.format.extent21
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofLocal Economyen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access article. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).en
dc.subjectBrexiten
dc.subjectRegional resilienceen
dc.subjectShocksen
dc.subjectSMEsen
dc.subjectUncertaintyen
dc.subjectHD28 Management. Industrial Managementen
dc.subjectJN101 Great Britainen
dc.subjectJN1187 Scotlanden
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccHD28en
dc.subject.lccJN101en
dc.subject.lccJN1187en
dc.titleShocks, uncertainty and regional resilience : the case of Brexit and Scottish SMEsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for the Study of Philanthropy & Public Gooden
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Responsible Banking and Financeen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Managementen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0269094220979261
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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