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dc.contributor.authorPatchett, R.
dc.contributor.authorCresswell, Will
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T10:30:06Z
dc.date.available2020-11-23T10:30:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-20
dc.identifier.citationPatchett , R & Cresswell , W 2020 , ' Regional wind patterns likely shape a seasonal migration detour ' , Journal of Avian Biology , vol. 51 , no. 11 , e02466 . https://doi.org/10.1111/jav.02466en
dc.identifier.issn0908-8857
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 269886044
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: a81a9b59-82ee-4995-9b75-18ea5526d1f7
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-4684-7624/work/84314954
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85096520068
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000595749100006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/21036
dc.descriptionFunding: AP Leventis Conservation Foundation.en
dc.description.abstractMigrating animals should optimise time and energy use when migrating, travelling directly to their destination. Detours from the most direct route may arise however because of barriers and weather conditions. Identifying how such situations arise from variable weather conditions is crucial to understand population response in the light of increased anthropogenic climate change. Here we used light-level geolocators to follow Cyprus wheatears for their full annual cycle in two separate years migrating between Cyprus, over the Mediterranean and the Sahara to winter in north-east sub-Saharan Africa. We predicted that any route detours would be related to wind conditions experienced during migration. We found that spring migration for all birds included an eastern detour, whilst autumn migrations were direct across the Sahara. The direct autumn migration was likely a consequence of consistent tail-winds, whilst the eastern detour in spring is likely to be more efficient given the wind conditions which are against a direct route. Such variable migration routes shaped by coincidence with prevailing winds are probably common suggesting that some birds may be able to adapt to future changes in wind conditions.
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Avian Biologyen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 The Authors. Journal of Avian Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectBird migrationen
dc.subjectGeolocatoren
dc.subjectLoop migrationen
dc.subjectMigration detouren
dc.subjectWinden
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleRegional wind patterns likely shape a seasonal migration detouren
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Scottish Oceans Instituteen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.St Andrews Sustainability Instituteen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/jav.02466
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-11-20


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