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dc.contributor.authorPrest, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-19T23:38:35Z
dc.date.available2020-10-19T23:38:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-20
dc.identifier.citationPrest , J 2019 , ' Parisian Palimpsests and Creole Creations : Mme Marsan and Dlle Minette play Nina on the Caribbean Stage ' , Early Modern French Studies , vol. Latest Articles . https://doi.org/10.1080/20563035.2019.1592813en
dc.identifier.issn2056-3035
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 257463400
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 09dc398a-2dd0-45c2-971f-b8b14d7cbca3
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-3266-7390/work/55643795
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85063318200
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000510665200006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/20801
dc.descriptionThe author acknowledges the generous support of The Leverhulme Trust, who awarded a Research Fellowship in 2017-18.en
dc.description.abstractThis article compares the theatrical careers in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) of two performers: Mme Marsan, a white European who dominated the public stage in 1780s Cap-Français, and a younger Creole woman of mixed racial ancestry, known as ‘Minette’, who performed in her home town of Port-au-Prince. Its focus is on performances of Dalayrac’s opéra-comique, Nina (1786), in which both women performed the lead role. Although Minette is regarded as a singer, it is argued that, by electing to put on and star in Nina, she was taking on one of the most demanding acting roles in the repertoire. The article considers the self-positioning – and positioning by others – of both performers in relation to the metropolitan performance model and the possibility of creating creolized forms of theatre. While Mme Marsan acknowledged that she was playing a role previously performed successfully in Paris by Mme Dugazon, Minette’s approach was more complex: drawing on unacknowledged references to a review of Dugazon’s performance, Minette also invoked a common Creole background that she claimed to share with her local audience. The metropolitan ‘model’ was thus not always imitated; it was also used as inspiration for new, subtly creolized forms of theatre.
dc.format.extent19
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Modern French Studiesen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Society for Early Modern French Studies 2019. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1080/20563035.2019.1592813en
dc.subjectSaint-Domingueen
dc.subjectColonial theatreen
dc.subjectCreole theatreen
dc.subjectOpéra-comiqueen
dc.subjectFemale performersen
dc.subjectMme Marsanen
dc.subjectMinetteen
dc.subjectMme Dugazonen
dc.subjectNinaen
dc.subjectActing techniqueen
dc.subjectPN2000 Dramatic representation. The Theateren
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subject.lccPN2000en
dc.titleParisian Palimpsests and Creole Creations : Mme Marsan and Dlle Minette play Nina on the Caribbean Stageen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for the Public Understanding of Greek and Roman Dramaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Frenchen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/20563035.2019.1592813
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-10-20


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