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dc.contributor.authorHasler, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-19T23:34:19Z
dc.date.available2020-08-19T23:34:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-20
dc.identifier.citationHasler , R 2018 , ' 'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe' : The Trimming of Thomas Nashe , Cambridge, and scholarly reading ' , Renaissance Studies , vol. In press . https://doi.org/10.1111/rest.12504en
dc.identifier.issn0269-1213
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 254990989
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 3556553b-e7fd-4577-aef4-4260d31bcca9
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85052384750
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000471337700003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/20488
dc.descriptionThis research was undertaken during the course of a SGSAH AHRC studentshipen
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the distinctive culture of critical reading based around the University of Cambridge in the 1590s. Drawing upon new evidence that The Trimming of Thomas Nashe (1597) was produced by a Cambridge stationer for an audience of Cambridge scholars, it reconstructs the literary values of this community. The Trimming parodies Nashe's Have With You to Saffron‐Walden (1596). Its purported author – Richard Lichfield – draws upon his close reading of Have With You to attack Nashe by imitating his style. Similarly, the Parnassus Plays – which were performed at St John's College, Cambridge, between 1598 and 1601 – allude to the works of Nashe and Lichfield, and offer a comparable appraisal of contemporary literature. By unravelling the connections between Nashe, Lichfield, and the Parnassus Plays, this article demonstrates that some writers and stationers marketed their works to a specifically scholarly audience. These scholars used critical reading to reinforce a sense of community that was characterized by their perceived social and educational superiority to other readers, and that responded to their insecurities regarding the role of professional writers in the Elizabethan book trade.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofRenaissance Studiesen
dc.rights© 2018 The Society for Renaissance Studies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1111/rest.12504en
dc.subjectThomas Nasheen
dc.subjectCambridgeen
dc.subjectEarly Modern printen
dc.subjectParnassus Playsen
dc.subjectGabriel Harveyen
dc.subjectP Language and Literatureen
dc.subjectLiterature and Literary Theoryen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccPen
dc.title'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe' : The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly readingen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Englishen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/rest.12504
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-08-20


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