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dc.contributor.authorWalmsley, Sam
dc.contributor.authorRendell, Luke Edward
dc.contributor.authorHussey, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorMarcoux, Marianne
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-12T23:37:38Z
dc.date.available2020-08-12T23:37:38Z
dc.date.issued2020-02
dc.identifier266390996
dc.identifier53e009ac-ae41-4849-8877-d2fc048bd98e
dc.identifier85079768025
dc.identifier000515804300001
dc.identifier.citationWalmsley , S , Rendell , L E , Hussey , N & Marcoux , M 2020 , ' Vocal sequences in narwhals ( Monodon monoceros ) ' , Journal of the Acoustical Society of America , vol. 147 , no. 2 , pp. 1078-1091 . https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0000671en
dc.identifier.issn0001-4966
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-1121-9142/work/69029614
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/20457
dc.description.abstractSequences are indicative of signal complexity in vocal communication. While vocal sequences are well-described in birds and terrestrial mammals, the extent to which marine mammals use them is less well understood. This study documents the first known examples of sequence use in the narwhal (Monodon monoceros), a gregarious Arctic cetacean. Eight female narwhals were fitted with animal-borne recording devices, resulting in one of the largest datasets of narwhal acoustic behaviour to date. A combination of visual and quantitative classification procedures was used to test whether subjectively defined vocalization patterns were organized into sequences. Next, acoustic characteristics were analyzed to assess whether sequences could disclose group or individual identity. Finally, generalized linear models was used to investigate the behavioural context under which sequences were produced. Two types of sequences, consisting of “paired” patterns and “burst pulse series,” were identified. Sequences of burst pulse series were typically produced in periods of high vocal activity, whereas the opposite was true for sequences of paired patterns, suggesting different functions for each. These findings extend the set of odontocetes which are known to use vocal sequences. Inquiry into vocal sequences in other understudied marine mammals may provide further insights into the evolution of vocal communication.
dc.format.extent2784602
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Acoustical Society of Americaen
dc.subjectGC Oceanographyen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subjectSDG 14 - Life Below Wateren
dc.subject.lccGCen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleVocal sequences in narwhals (Monodon monoceros)en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Sea Mammal Research Uniten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Bioacoustics groupen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Marine Alliance for Science & Technology Scotlanden
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/10.0000671
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-08-13


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