Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorReed, Adam
dc.contributor.authorBialecki, Jon
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-06T23:34:09Z
dc.date.available2020-08-06T23:34:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-07
dc.identifier.citationReed , A & Bialecki , J 2018 , ' Introduction to special section 2 : anthropology and character ' , Social Anthropology , vol. 26 , no. 3 , pp. 305-313 . https://doi.org/10.1111/1469-8676.12546en
dc.identifier.issn0964-0282
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 253343608
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: ed2865ab-4a7e-46ca-b711-3c905dd0d8bb
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85051113130
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8917-6341/work/47356674
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000441009600002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/20420
dc.descriptionThe authors thank The Ladislav Holy Memorial Trust for sponsoring the original Anthropology of Character conference, held at the University of St Andrews in 2016en
dc.description.abstractThe introductory essay to this second special section on Anthropology and Character seeks to extend an exploration of the relevance of the character concept, in part by looking beyond its exclusive attribution to the human subject. While continuing to develop the insights of previous discussions about both the emic and etic status of the concept, in obvious fields such as the anthropology of ethics and the anthropology of Christianity, the authors here ask what difference it makes to begin analysis with a description of non‐human characters. This includes calling our attention to the objects of character – its specific materialisations. By reflecting on various examples offered by the special section's contributors, such as the characterful nature popularly assigned to animals, to scientific units of behaviour and to historic places and buildings, new questions are identified for an emergent project on Anthropology and Character. This leads to a broader examination of characterisation as an enactment on the page (or stage) but also in the world, and on the role of audience (or reader) in the recognition of a character's distinctiveness. Finally, we ask what consequences these reflections might have for the ways in which we treat characterisation as a feature of anthropological writing.
dc.format.extent9
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Anthropologyen
dc.rights© 2018 European Association of Social Anthropologists. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1111/1469-8676.12546en
dc.subjectNon-humanen
dc.subjectMaterial cultureen
dc.subjectDistinctivenessen
dc.subjectLiterary strategyen
dc.subjectExpertiseen
dc.subjectGN Anthropologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGNen
dc.titleIntroduction to special section 2 : anthropology and characteren
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Social Anthropologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Pacific Studiesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/1469-8676.12546
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-08-07


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record