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dc.contributor.authorGarrod, Brian
dc.contributor.authorDowell, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T14:30:05Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T14:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-17
dc.identifier.citationGarrod , B & Dowell , D 2020 , ' The role of childhood participation in cultural activities in the promotion of pro-social behaviours in later life ' , Sustainability , vol. 12 , no. 14 , 5744 . https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145744en
dc.identifier.issn2071-1050
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 269273707
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: fa97e669-e338-4aac-9bda-a08b3b58580c
dc.identifier.otherBibtex: su12145744
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85095608003
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-4788-5240/work/77893853
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000554244900001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/20331
dc.description.abstractCultural organisations often serve as guardians of cultural heritage and, as such, cultural sustainability depends on their ongoing vitality. Many organisations in the cultural sector are, however, presently experiencing intense financial pressures. With their traditional sources of funding being progressively cut off, such organisations are focusing increasingly on monetary donations and the volunteering of time on the part of the general public to help plug the financial gap. Promoting and managing such pro-social behaviours can, however, be costly activities in themselves, so it is critical for cultural organisations to be able to target those segments of the public with the greatest propensity to give. This study sets out to address that need. The findings indicate that individuals who were involved in cultural activities as children are statistically more likely to volunteer their time in later life, not only with cultural organisations but also with good causes in general. In certain circumstances, this is also true of donating money. The cultural organisations benefiting from these pro-social behaviours need not be those with which the individual was involved in their childhood; nor need they be associated with the same form of culture. Importantly, continuous involvement in an activity from childhood into adulthood is not a necessary pre-condition for pro-social behaviour in later life.
dc.format.extent16
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSustainabilityen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.subjectPro-socialen
dc.subjectVolunteeringen
dc.subjectDonationen
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectParticipationen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectH Social Sciencesen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subject.lccHen
dc.titleThe role of childhood participation in cultural activities in the promotion of pro-social behaviours in later lifeen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Managementen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/su12145744
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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