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dc.contributor.authorSzabo, Birgit
dc.contributor.authorNoble, Daniel W.A.
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Richard W.
dc.contributor.authorTait, David S.
dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Martin J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-10T23:34:22Z
dc.date.available2020-07-10T23:34:22Z
dc.date.issued2019-08
dc.identifier.citationSzabo , B , Noble , D W A , Byrne , R W , Tait , D S & Whiting , M J 2019 , ' Precocial juvenile lizards show adult level learning and behavioural flexibility ' , Animal Behaviour , vol. 154 , pp. 75-84 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2019.06.003en
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 259622308
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c9baeabe-3751-40b6-81e9-9e5aa6e2d8dc
dc.identifier.otherRIS: urn:C132BD5A775819B95457A4F2C363A809
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85064605948
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-5310-7731/work/60195432
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-9862-9373/work/60630547
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000478986500011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/20233
dc.descriptionThis project was funded by an ARC Discovery grant (DP130102998) to M.J.W. and R.W.B. and by Macquarie University.en
dc.description.abstractIn altricial species, young rely on parental care and brain maturation mainly occurs after birth. In precocial species, young are born at a more advanced developmental stage in need of less or no parental care and brain development is mostly completed at the time of birth. We therefore predicted early maturation of learning ability in precocial species. We used a series of visual discrimination and reversal stages to investigate the ability of the precocial eastern blue-tongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides scincoides, a long-lived Australian lizard species with slow-developing young, to respond to changes in stimulus relevance and test for behavioural flexibility. To test whether age affects learning in this species, we compared juveniles (23–56 days) with adults (sexually mature, at least 2 years). In accordance with our expectations, adults and juveniles performed similarly well in all stages, suggesting that juveniles of this precocial species learn at adult levels from an early age. Both age classes performed well during reversals showing good behavioural flexibility. This is the first study in lizards to directly compare juvenile and adult behavioural flexibility. Importantly, we demonstrate that precocial lizards can begin life with an advanced cognitive ability already in place.In altricial species, young rely on parental care and brain maturation mainly occurs after birth. In precocial species, young are born at a more advanced developmental stage in need of less or no parental care and brain development is mostly completed at the time of birth. We therefore predicted early maturation of learning ability in precocial species. We used a series of visual discrimination and reversal stages to investigate the ability of the precocial eastern blue-tongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides scincoides, a long-lived Australian lizard species with slow-developing young, to respond to changes in stimulus relevance and test for behavioural flexibility. To test whether age affects learning in this species, we compared juveniles (23–56 days) with adults (sexually mature, at least 2 years). In accordance with our expectations, adults and juveniles performed similarly well in all stages, suggesting that juveniles of this precocial species learn at adult levels from an early age. Both age classes performed well during reversals showing good behavioural flexibility. This is the first study in lizards to directly compare juvenile and adult behavioural flexibility. Importantly, we demonstrate that precocial lizards can begin life with an advanced cognitive ability already in place.In altricial species, young rely on parental care and brain maturation mainly occurs after birth. In precocial species, young are born at a more advanced developmental stage in need of less or no parental care and brain development is mostly completed at the time of birth. We therefore predicted early maturation of learning ability in precocial species. We used a series of visual discrimination and reversal stages to investigate the ability of the precocial eastern blue-tongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides scincoides, a long-lived Australian lizard species with slow-developing young, to respond to changes in stimulus relevance and test for behavioural flexibility. To test whether age affects learning in this species, we compared juveniles (23–56 days) with adults (sexually mature, at least 2 years). In accordance with our expectations, adults and juveniles performed similarly well in all stages, suggesting that juveniles of this precocial species learn at adult levels from an early age. Both age classes performed well during reversals showing good behavioural flexibility. This is the first study in lizards to directly compare juvenile and adult behavioural flexibility. Importantly, we demonstrate that precocial lizards can begin life with an advanced cognitive ability already in place.In altricial species, young rely on parental care and brain maturation mainly occurs after birth. In precocial species, young are born at a more advanced developmental stage in need of less or no parental care and brain development is mostly completed at the time of birth. We therefore predicted early maturation of learning ability in precocial species. We used a series of visual discrimination and reversal stages to investigate the ability of the precocial eastern blue-tongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides scincoides, a long-lived Australian lizard species with slow-developing young, to respond to changes in stimulus relevance and test for behavioural flexibility. To test whether age affects learning in this species, we compared juveniles (23–56 days) with adults (sexually mature, at least 2 years). In accordance with our expectations, adults and juveniles performed similarly well in all stages, suggesting that juveniles of this precocial species learn at adult levels from an early age. Both age classes performed well during reversals showing good behavioural flexibility. This is the first study in lizards to directly compare juvenile and adult behavioural flexibility. Importantly, we demonstrate that precocial lizards can begin life with an advanced cognitive ability already in place.
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Behaviouren
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2019.06.003en
dc.subjectAge differenceen
dc.subjectAltricial–precocialen
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectID/ED attentional set shiftingen
dc.subjectSquamatesen
dc.subjectBF Psychologyen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccBFen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titlePrecocial juvenile lizards show adult level learning and behavioural flexibilityen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2019.06.003
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-07-11


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